Pneumatic Seeders

 
 
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218 Friggstad PAl-40 Pneumatic Applicator
219 Prasco Super Seeder 75-55 Pneumatic Applicator
220 WiI-Rich 4150 Air Seeder
270 John Deere 665 Central Metering Seeder
271 Flexi-coil Air Flow Seeder
272 Morris M-600 Air Flow Seeder
296 John Shearer Model MK3 Air Seeder
297 Leon S-45 Air Seeder
298 Bourgault 138D Air Seeder
406 Concord Model AS1002 Air Seeder
501 Blanchard 5-Way Air Seeder
510 Great Plains Model ADC-0285-71 Air Drill
514 Hooper Seed Brake Boot
541 Cereal Implements Model 1203 Chinook Seeding & Fertilizing System
542 Morris Genesis II MA 170 Air Seeder
549 Flexi-coil 1100 Air Seeder
564 Flexi-coil 1600 Air Seeder
565 Cereal Implements Model 1150 Pneumatic Distribution System
569
Vern Seed Boot and Banding Knife

599 Victory Seed-A-Vator
651 Flexi-coil 5000 Air Drill
658 Bourgault 2155 II Air Seeder
684 Morris 6130 Air Seeder
694 Conserva Pak CP Series Seeder
696 Case IH 8500 Air Hoe Drill
712 Morris Maxim Air Drill
716 K-Hart Double Disk Direct Seeding Unit
734 K-Hart Coulter
735 Flexi-coil 1720 Air Cart
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Summary of Friggstad PA1-40 Pneumatic Applicator (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.40 MB)

Overall functional performance of the Friggstad PAl-40 pneumatic applicator was very good in all seeding conditions. Performance was good when banding fertilizer. When operated with the 10.7 m (35 ft) Friggstad B3-31 heavy duty cultivator, the. Friggstad PAl-40 was suitable for seeding both in primary and secondary field conditions. The Friggstad was also suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to 200 kg/ha (180 lb/ac). At rates above 200 kg/ha (180 lb/ac) a significant amount of fertilizer escaped from the metering system and dropped on the ground.

Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was slightly higher than with a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. Seed band width behind each seed boot was always wide enough to provide ample stubble for good windrow support. Maintaining good cultivator frame levelling and ensuring a seeding depth of at least 50 mm (2 in) were critical in ensuring good emergence.

The manufacturer's metering system calibrations were fairly accurate in wheat, barley, oats, rapeseed and fertilizer on the course meter settings. The manufacturer's calibration for rapeseed indicated only from 50 to 60% of the actual seeding rate when used on the "fine" meter settings. The Friggstad PAl -40 gave acceptable uniform seed distribution across the seeding width in wheat, barley, oats and rapeseed at normal application rates. To accommodate the 35 outlet requirement of the 10.7 m (35 ft) Friggstad B3-31 heavy duty cultivator, one port on each of the five secondary distribution headers was blocked. Significant improvements in distribution occurred when all eight ports were used on each secondary header.

Level of material in the tanks, field slope, field bounce and ground speed variation had little effect on metering.

Seeding rate was easily adjusted. Tank and meter clean-out was convenient. Tank filling required the use of a drill fill or auger. Four grease fittings on the applicator required daily greasing.

The Friggstad PAl-40 with B3-31 heavy duty cultivator and H340 packer drawbar could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes. Transport on paved roads required a separate means of packer transport to prevent packer and road damage.

Rate of work usually ranged from 8.6 to 10.7 ha/hr (21 to 27 ac/hr). About 45 ha (110 ac) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate.

Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, cultivator width and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage, at a 75 mm (3 in) depth and 8 km/h (5 mph), a 119 kW (160 hp) tractor was needed to operate the applicator-cultivator-packer combination. In heavy primary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 139 kW (185 hp) tractor was needed.

The centre frame cultivator tires were slightly overloaded in transport. Care had to be exercised when using the tank access ladder.

The operator's manual contained useful information on safety, adjustments, maintenance and operation. A detailed parts list was also included.

Only minor mechanical problems occurred during evaluation.

Summary of Prasco Super Seeder 75-55 Pneumatic Applicator (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.35 MB)

Overall functional performance of the Prasco 75-55 pneumatic applicator was good in all seeding conditions. Performance was good when banding fertilizer. When operated with the 10.7 m (35 ft) John Deere 1610 heavy duty cultivator, the Prasco 75-55 was suitable for seeding both in primary and secondary field conditions. The Prasco was also suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to 280 kg/ha (250 lb/ac).

Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was slightly higher than with a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. The 60 to 90 mm (2.5 to 3.5 in) seed band width behind each seed boot was wide enough to provide stubble support for windrows, providing light crops were not laid parallel to seeding rows. Maintaining good cultivator frame levelling and ensuring a seed depth of at least 50 mm (2 in) were critical in ensuring good emergence.

The manufacturer's metering system calibrations were fairly accurate in wheat, oats, rapeseed and fertilizer. No calibration was provided for barley. The Prasco 75-55 gave acceptable uniform seed distribution across the seeding width in wheat, barley and oats at normal application rates. Distribution in rapeseed and fertilizer was unacceptable at all application rates. To accommodate the 35 outlet requirement of the 10.7 m (35 ft) John Deere 1610 heavy duty cultivator, five of the available 40 ports on the secondary distribution headers were blocked. Significant improvements in distribution occurred when all 40 secondary header ports were used.

Level of material in the tanks, field bounce and ground speed variation had little effect on metering rates. A field sideslope of 15 resulted in a 7% decrease in seeding rate and a 4% decrease in the fertilizer rate. Seeding down a 15 slope caused a 10% decrease in seeding rate and a 7% decrease in fertilizing rates. Seeding up a hill had little effect on the metering rates. Distribution uniformity was only slightly affected by field slopes.

Seeding rate was easily adjusted. Tank and meter cleanout was inconvenient. Tank filling required the use of a drill fill or auger. Thirty two grease fittings on the applicator required greasing.

The Prasco 75-55 and packers, with John Deere 1610 heavy duty cultivator, could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes. Rate of work usually ranged from 8.6 to 10.7 ha/hr (21 to 27 ac/hr). About 40 ha (100 ac) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate.

Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, cultivator width and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage, at a 75 mm (3 in) depth and 8 km/h (5 mph), a 132 kW (175 hp) tractor was needed to operate the applicator-cultivator-packer combination. In heavy primary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 152 kW (200 hp) tractor was needed.

The centre frame cultivator tires were overloaded in transport when equipped with Prasco mounted packers. Care had to be exercised when using the tank access ladder.

The operator's manual contained useful information on safety, adjustment, maintenance and operation.

A number of minor mechanical problems occurred during evaluation.

Summary of Wil-Rich 4150 Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.29 MB)

Overall functional performance of the Wil-Rich 4150 air seeder with 8.4 m (27.4 ft) field cultivator was very good in all secondary seeding conditions. Seeding or banding fertilizer in primary field conditions is not recommended due to the light duty characteristics of the WiI-Rich field cultivator. The air seeder, if mounted on a heavy duty cultivator, would be suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to about 300 kg/ha (270 Ib/ac).

Seed placement was good in most pre-worked fields. Variation in seed depth depended on depth of tillage and was similar to seed depth variation with a conventional hoe drill when seeding at 50 mm (2 in). Seed depth variation increased slightly when seeding at depths of 50 to 75 mm (2 to 3 in). The 40 to 70 mm (1.6 to 2.8 in) seed band width, with 180 mm (7 in) shank spacing, provided good windrow support in all conditions. Good cultivator frame levelling was critical in obtaining a uniform seed depth and subsequent good emergence.

The manufacturer's metering system calibrations were fairly accurate in wheat, barley, oats, rapeseed and fertilizer. The Wil-Rich 4150 gave very uniform seed and fertilizer distribution across the machine width at all application rates.

Level of material in the tanks, field bounce and slope all had little effect on metering rates or on distribution uniformity. Increasing ground speed, slightly reduced the fertilizer metering rate.

Seeding rate adjustment was inconvenient and required about 10 minutes with wrenches. Tank and meter cleanout was inconvenient. Tank filling was convenient when using the optional filler auger. Twenty-nine grease fittings on the applicator required greasing every other day while 47 fittings on the packer wheels required daily greasing.

The Wil-Rich 4150 with 8.4 m (27.4 ft) Wil-Rich field cultivator and mounted packers could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Rate of work usually ranged from 6.5 to 8.1 ha/hr (16 to 20 ac/hr). About 26 ha (65 ac) could be seeded before refilling all compartments on both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate.

Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, cultivator width and soil finishing attachments. In light secondary tillage, at a 75 mm (3 in) depth and 8 km/h (5 mph), an 81 kW (109 hp) tractor was needed to operate the applicator-cultivator-packer combination. In heavy secondary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 106 kW (142 hp) tractor was needed.

The optional marker was very convenient for aligning the seeder on subsequent rounds. Marker operation convenience was reduced due to poor lowering characteristics, marker pan bearing failure and marker arm shear bolt failure.

The operator's manual contained useful information on safety, adjustment, maintenance and operation.

A number of minor mechanical problems occurred during evaluation.

Summary of John Deere 665 Central Metering Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.28 MB)

Overall functional performance of the John Deere 665 central metering seeder was very good in all seeding conditions. Performance was very good when banding fertilizer. The John Deere 665 was suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to 262 kg/ha (233 lb/ac) at 9 km/h (5.5 mph). Higher application rates were possible at reduced speeds.

Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was slightly higher than with a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. Row spacing and seed band width behind each seed boot provided ample stubble for good windrow support. Maintaining accurate cultivator frame levelling and ensuring a seed depth of at least 50 mm (2 in) were critical in ensuring good emergence.

The manufacturer's metering system calibrations were accurate in wheat, barley, oats and fertilizer. The measured calibration for rapeseed was about 20% higher than the manufacturer's calibration at normal seeding rates.

Distribution uniformity across the machine width in wheat, barley, oats and rapeseed was acceptable at all normal seeding rates. Distribution uniformity was acceptable over the entire application rate range for fertilizer.

Field bounce, field slope and ground speed variation had little effect on metering rates. Field slope had a small effect on distribution uniformity.

Operator visibility of the cultivator mainframe was obstructed by the tanks.

Seeding rate was easily adjusted with a wrench. Tank and meter cleanout was convenient. Tank filling with the optional filler auger was convenient. Five fittings and five wheel bearings on the applicator required greasing.

The John Deere 665 Central Metering seeder could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Rate of work usually ranged from 9.7 to 12.2 ha/h (24 to 30 ac/h). About 62 ha (153 ac) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate.

Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, ground speed, and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage, at a 75 mm (3 in) depth and 8 km/h (5 mph), a 132 kW (177 hp) tractor was needed to operate the seeder. In heavy primary tillage at the same depth and speed, a 155 kW (208 hp) tractor was needed.

The centre frame cultivator tires were overloaded in transport. Care was required to avoid operator injury while lowering the optional filler auger.

The operator's manual contained useful information on assembly, safety, specifications, adjustment, maintenance and operation.

Only minor mechanical problems occurred during evaluation.

Summary of Flexi-coil Air Flow Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.34 MB)

Overall functional performance of the Flexi-coil air flow seeder was good in all seeding conditions. Performance was good when banding fertilizer. When operated with the 10.7 m (35 ft) John Deere 1610 heavy duty cultivator, the Flexi-coil was suitable for seeding both in primary and secondary field conditions. The Flexi-coil was also suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to 365 kg/ha (325 lb/ac) at 9 km/h (5.5 mph). Higher application rates were possible at reduced speeds.

Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was slightly higher than with a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. Row spacing and seed band width behind each seed boot provided ample stubble for good windrow support. Maintaining good cultivator frame levelling and ensuring a seed depth of at least 50 mm (2 in) were critical in ensuring good emergence.

The manufacturer's metering system calibrations were acceptable in wheat, barley, oats, and fertilizer. The manufacturer's meter calibration was inaccurate for rapeseed.

Distribution uniformity was acceptable in wheat and barley at normal seeding rates and at rates up to 50 kg/ha (45 lb/ac) in oats. Distribution in rapeseed and fertilizer was unacceptable at all application rates.

Field bounce, field slope and ground speed had little effect on metering rates. Distribution uniformity was only slightly affected by field slope.

Seeding rate was easily adjusted. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was fair. Tank filling required the use of a drill fill or auger. Eleven grease fittings and two wheel bearings on the applicator required greasing.

Operator visibility of the cultivator was obstructed by the tanks.

The Flexi-coil with John Deere 1610 heavy duty cultivator could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes. Rate of work usually ranged from 8.6 to 10.7 ha/hr (21 to 27 ac/hr). About 58 ha (142 ac) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate.

Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, ground speed, cultivator width, and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage, at 75 mm (3 in) depth and 8 km/h (5 mph), a 107 kW (144 hp) tractor was needed to operate the applicator/cultivator combination. In heavy primary tillage at the same depth and speed, a 128 kW (173 hp) tractor was needed.

The cultivator centre frame tires were slightly overloaded in transport position and the applicator tires were overloaded with full tanks.

The operator's manual contained useful information on safety, adjustment, assembly, maintenance and operation. A detailed parts list was also included.

Only minor mechanical problems occurred during the evaluation.

Summary of Morris M-600 Air Flow Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.32 MB)

Overall functional performance of the Morris M-600 air flow seeder was good in all seeding conditions. Performance was good when banding fertilizer at low application rates. When operated with the 9.5 m (31 ft) Morris CP-731 heavy duty cultivator, the Morris M-600 was suitable for seeding both in primary and in secondary field conditions. The Morris was also suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to 172 kg/ha (153 lb/ac) at 9 km/h (5.5 mph). When equipped with an alternate larger fan, supplied by the manufacturer at the end of the evaluation, the Morris M-600 was capable of banding fertilizer at application rates up to 263 kg/ha (234 lb/ac) at 9 km/h (5.5 mph). Higher application rates were possible at reduced speeds.

Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was slightly higher than with a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. The crop emerged in distinct rows with seed band widths ranging from 85 to 135 mm (3.3 to 5.3 in) behind each seed boot. With 305 mm (12 in) shank spacing, distance between rows varied from 170 to 220 mm (6.7 to 8.7 in). Row spacing and seed band width were usually wide enough to provide stubble support for most windrows, providing very light crops were not laid parallel to seeding rows. Maintaining good cultivator frame levelling and ensuring a seed depth of at least 50 mm (2 in) were critical in ensuring good emergence.

The manufacturer's metering calibrations were acceptable in barley, oats and fertilizer. The measured calibration was 22% higher than the manufacturer's rate for wheat and was over twice the manufacturer's rate for rapeseed at normal seeding rates.

Distribution uniformity across the seeding width in wheat, barley, oats and rapeseed was acceptable at all normal seeding rates. Distribution uniformity was acceptable in fertilizer at rates up to 160 kg/ha (142 lb/ac).

Field bounce, field slope and ground speed variation had little effect on metering rates. Travelling up a 10 slope caused a 10% increase in seeding rate and a 12% increase in fertilizing rate. Travelling down a 10 slope caused a 10% decrease in seeding rate and a 17% decrease in fertilizing rate. Distribution uniformity was only slightly affected by field slope.

Seeding rate was easily adjusted. Tank and meter cleanout was inconvenient. Tank filling by hand was possible but was more convenient with a drill fill. Five grease fittings and two wheel bearings on the applicator required greasing.

The Morris M-600 with CP-731 cultivator could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Operator visibility of the cultivator was unobstructed by the low profile tanks.

Rate of work usually ranged from 7.6 to 9.5 ha/hr (19 to 24 ac/hr). About 24 ha (58 ac) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate.

Tractor size depended on field conditions, seeding depth, ground speed, cultivator width, and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage, at 75 mm (3 in) depth and 8 km/h (5 mph), a 95 kW (128 hp) tractor was needed to operate the applicator/cultivator combination. In heavy primary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 115 kW (154 hp) tractor was needed.

The operator's manual contained information on safety, adjustment, specifications, maintenance and operation. A detailed parts list was also included.

Only minor mechanical problems occurred during evaluation.

Summary of John Shearer Model MK3 Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.39 MB)

Overall Performance: Performance of the John Shearer model MK3 air seeder was good in all seeding conditions. Performance was good when banding fertilizer. When operated with the 33 ft (9.9 m) Edwards CSF-833 heavy duty cultivator, the John Shearer MK3 was suitable for seeding and fertilizer banding in light primary and secondary field conditions. The John Shearer was suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to about 210 lb/ac (236 kg/ha) at 5.5 mph (9 km/h). Higher application rates were possible at reduced speeds. Suitability for seeding and banding fertilizer was reduced in heavy primary tillage due to the light shank spring characteristics of the cultivator. Other heavy duty cultivators, with more rigid shank characteristics, could be used in conjunction with the John Shearer for heavy primary tillage conditions.

Metering Calibration: The manufacturer's metering calibrations were fairly accurate in wheat, barley and oats. The manufacturer's calibration was inaccurate in fertilizer. A calibration for canola was not supplied.

Distribution Uniformity: Distribution uniformity across the seeding width in wheat, barley, oats and fertilizer was acceptable when seeding using two secondary header outlets per shank. Distribution uniformity was unacceptable in canola using two secondary header outlets per shank. Distribution uniformity in fertilizer, when applied with the seed and using two secondary outlets per shank, was acceptable. When banding fertilizer, using only one secondary header outlet per shank, distribution uniformity was unacceptable at rates above 83 lb/ac (93 kg/ha).

Effect of Field Variables: Field bounce, sideslope and ground speed had little effect on metering rates. Travelling up or down 10 slopes caused up to a 13% change in seeding rate and up to a 9% change in fertilizer rate. Distribution uniformity was only slightly affected by field slope.

Grain Damage: Grain damage by the metering and distribution system was within acceptable limits at normal fan speeds.

Seed Placement and Emergence: Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was slightly higher than with a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. Row spacing and seed band width behind each seed boot provided ample stubble for good windrow support. Good cultivator frame levelling was critical to obtain a uniform seeding depth and subsequent good crop emergence.

Ease of Adjustment and Operation: Seeding rate within both the high or low metering ranges was easily adjusted. Changing sprockets from high to low range or from low to high range was difficult due to poor access. The need to multiply metering calibration charts by different factors for each sprocket combination was inconvenient. Tank and meter cleanout was inconvenient. Twenty-three grease fittings and two wheel bearings on the applicator required greasing.

Operator visibility of the cultivator was not obstructed by the low profile tanks.

The John Shearer MK3 with Edwards CSF-833 cultivator could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Rate of Work: The rate of work usually ranged from 20 to 24 ac/hr (8.1 to 9.7 ha/hr). About 68 ac (27.5 ha) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate. Using only the larger front tank, 39 ac (15.9 ha) could be seeded before refilling.

Power Requirements: Tractor size depended on field conditions, seeding depth, ground speed, cultivator width and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage, at a 3 in (75 mm) depth and 5 mph (8 km/h), a 139 hp (104 kW) tractor was needed to operate the applicator-cultivator combination. In heavy primary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 171 hp (128 kW) tractor was needed.

Safety: The tank access ladder did not have a safety handrail. The John Shearer MK3 was otherwise safe to operate providing normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual contained information on assembly, adjustment, operation and maintenance. A detailed parts list was also included. No information on safety was contained in the operator's manual.

Mechanical Problems: Only minor mechanical problems occurred during the evaluation. Problems included seed boot bending and wear and a downward shift in meter calibrations from the start to the end of the test.

Summary of Leon S-45 Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.46 MB)

Overall Performance: Performance of the Leon S-45 air seeder was good in all seeding conditions. Performance was very good when banding fertilizer. When operated with the 36 ft (11 m) Leon CP-737 heavy duty cultivator, the Leon S-45 was suitable for seeding and fertilizer banding in both primary and secondary field conditions. The Leon S-45 was suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to 300 lb/ac (337 kg/ha) at 5.5 mph (9 km/h).

Meter Calibrations: The manufacturer's metering system calibration charts were inaccurate in wheat, barley, oats, and fertilizer. The manufacturer's calibration chart for canola was fairly accurate at high seeding rates and no manufacturer's calibration chart was provided for lower rates.

Distribution Uniformity: Distribution uniformity across the seeding width. when seeding on level ground, was acceptable in wheat, barley, and oats. Distribution uniformity in fertilizer was acceptable at rates up to 300 lb/ac (340 kg/ha). Distribution uniformity was unacceptable when seeding canola.

Effect of Field Variables: Field bounce, slope and forward speed all had only a small effect on metering rates. Travelling up and down field slopes only slightly affected the distribution pattern. Field side slopes, however, had a large effect on distribution uniformity due to reduced dividing effectiveness on the primary header when operating on a sideslope.

Grain Damage: Grain damage by the metering and distribution system was within acceptable limits at normal fan speeds.

Seed Placement and Emergence: Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was similar to a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same conditions. Row spacing and seed band width behind each seed boot provided adequate windrow support providing light windrows were not laid parallel to the seeding rows. Good cultivator frame levelling was critical to obtain a uniform seeding depth and subsequent good crop emergence.

Ease of Adjustment and Operation: Seeding rate was easily adjusted. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was fair. Tank filling required the use of a drill fill or auger. Nineteen grease fittings and two wheel bearings on the applicator required greasing.

Operator visibility of the cultivator was obstructed by the tanks.

The Leon S-45 with Leon CP-737 cultivator could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Rate of Work: The rate of work usually ranged from 22 to 26 ac/hr (8.9 to 10.5 ha/hr). About 82 ac (33.2 ha) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate. Using only the larger rear tank, 46 ac (18.6 ha) could be seeded before refilling.

Power Requirements: Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, ground speed, cultivator width, and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage, at 3 in (75 mm) depth, and 5 mph (8 km/h), a 143 hp (107 kW) tractor was needed to operate the air seeder-cultivator combination. In heavy primary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 179 hp (134 kW) tractor was needed.

Safety: Operator care was required when operating the fan engine controls to avoid contact with the engine exhaust. The Leon S-45 was otherwise safe to operate providing normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual contained useful information on safety, adjustment, assembly, maintenance and operation. Also included were useful sections on checking distribution uniformity and metering accuracy in the field.

Mechanical Problems: A number of mechanical problems occurred during the evaluation. Problems included failure of a main distribution tube connection and failure of a fan bearing.

Summary of Bourgault 138D Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.41 MB)

Overall Performance: Performance of the Bourgault Model 138D air seeder was very good for seeding and fertilizer banding in secondary and light primary field conditions. Suitability for seeding and banding fertilizer was reduced in heavy primary tillage due to the light shank spring characteristics of the Bourgault Model 36-40 Commander intermediate duty cultivator. The Bourgault 138D was suitable for banding fertilizer in secondary and light primary field conditions at application rates up to 215 lb/ac (242 kg/ha).

Meter Calibrations: The manufacturer's metering system calibrations were accurate in wheat and barley and fairly accurate in oats, canola and 11-51-00 fertilizer.

Distribution Uniformity: Distribution uniformity across the seeding width was acceptable in all materials used throughout the test.

Effect of Field Variables: Field bounce had little effect on metering rates. Field slope and ground speed had only a small effect on metering rates. Distribution uniformity was only slightly affected by field slope.

Grain Damage: Grain damage by the metering and distribution system was within acceptable limits at normal fan speeds.

Seed Placement: Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was similar to a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. Row spacing and seed band width behind each seed boot provided ample stubble for good windrow support. Good cultivator frame levelling was critical in obtaining a uniform seed depth and subsequent good crop emergence.

Ease of Adjustment and Operation: Seeding rate was easily adjusted. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was good. Tank filling required the use of a drill fill or auger. Thirteen grease fittings and three wheel bearings on the applicator required greasing.

Since the applicator was towed behind the cultivator, operator visibility of the cultivator was not obstructed by the tanks. The Bourgault 138D with Bourgault 36-40 cultivator could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Rate of Work: The rate of work usually ranged from 24 to 30 ac/hr (9.7 to 12.2 ha/hr). About 96 ac (39 ha) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate. Using only the larger front tank. 53 ac (21 ha) could be seeded before refilling.

Power Requirements: Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, ground speed, cultivator width and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage, at a 3 in (75 mm) depth and 5 mph (8 km/h), a 163 hp (122 kW) tractor was needed to operate the applicator-cultivator combination. In heavy primary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 200 hp (149 kW) tractor was needed.

Safety: The cultivator tires were overloaded by about 20% in transport position. The Bourgault 138D was otherwise safe to operate providing normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual contained useful information on safety, adjustment, assembly, specifications, operation. lubrication and maintenance. A detailed parts list was also included.

Mechanical Problems: Only minor mechanical problems occurred during the evaluation.

Summary of Concord Model AS1002 Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.55 MB)

Functional Performance: Performance of the Concord model AS1002 was good for seeding and fertilizer banding in secondary and light primary field conditions. Suitability for seeding and banding fertilizer was reduced in heavy primary tillage due to light shank spring characteristics of the Concord model ATD 2012 air till drill. The Concord model AS1002 was suitable for banding fertilizer in secondary and light primary field conditions at application rates up to 200 lb/ac (226 kg/ha) at 5.5 mph (9.0 km/h).

Meter Calibrations: The manufacturer's metering system calibration charts were fairly accurate in wheat, barley, oats and fertilizer. There were differences between front and rear tank rates. The manufacturer's calibration chart was accurate in canola for both meters. The manufacturer's calibration chart for 11-51-0 fertilizer was accurate for the rear meter but inaccurate for the front meter.

Distribution Uniformity: Distribution uniformity across the seeding width was acceptable in wheat, barley, oats and canola. Distribution uniformity in fertilizer was acceptable at rates up to 200 lb/ac (226 kg/ha).

Effect of Field Variables: Field bounce had little effect on metering rates. Field slope and ground speed had only a small effect on metering rates. Distribution uniformity was only slightly affected by field slope.

Grain Damage: Grain damage by the metering and distribution system was within acceptable limits at normal fan speeds.

Seed Placement: Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was similar to a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. Row spacing and seed band width behind each seed boot provided ample stubble for good windrow support, providing light crops were laid across the rows rather than parallel to them. Good cultivator frame levelling was critical in obtaining a uniform seed depth and subsequent good crop emergence.

Ease of Adjustment and Operation: Seeding rate was difficult to adjust. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was good. Tank filling required the use of a drill fill or auger. Eleven grease fittings on the applicator and forty-nine on the cultivator required greasing.

Since the applicator was towed behind the cultivator, operator visibility of the cultivator was not obstructed by the tanks. The Concord model AS1002 and Concord model ATD 2012 air till drill could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Rate of Work: The rate of work usually ranged from 10 to 14 ac/hr (4 to 5.6 ha/hr). About 90 ac (36 ha) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate. Using only one tank, 45 ac (18 ha) could be seeded before refilling.

Power Requirements: Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, ground speed, cultivator width and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage at a 3 in (75 mm) depth and 5 mph (8 km/h), an 84 hp (61 kW) tractor was needed to operate the applicator-cultivator combination. In light secondary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 60 hp (45 kW) tractor was needed.

Safety: Operator care was required when mounting the applicator because of the engine exhaust from the applicator gas engine being directed onto the ladder. The Concord model AS1002 was otherwise safe to operate, providing normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual contained useful information on safety, adjustment, assembly, operations, lubrication and maintenance. A detailed parts list was also included.

Mechanical Problems: A number of mechanical problems occurred during the evaluation. Problems included failure of the front pivot point on the cultivator and of the cultivator hitch tongue. A number of cultivator and applicator frame modifications were made by the manufacturer to brace and strengthen both units.

Summary of Blanchard 5-Way Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.63 MB)

Functional Performance: Performance of the Blanchard 5-Way air seeder was good for seeding and fertilizer banding in all types of conditions. When operated with the 36.7 ft (11.2 m) Case International 5500 chisel plow, the Blanchard was suitable for seeding and fertilizer banding in light primary and secondary field conditions. The Blanchard 5-Way was suitable for banding fertilizer at application rates up to 234 lb/ac (266 kg/ha) at 5.5 mph (9.0 km/h) with the sprocket combinations supplied. Higher rates are possible with other sprocket combinations. The light shank spring characteristics of the cultivator limited the suitability of the unit for seeding and banding fertilizer under heavy primary conditions. Other heavy duty cultivators, with more rigid shank characteristics, could be used in conjunction with the Blanchard for heavy primary tillage conditions.

Meter Calibrations: The calibration charts for wheat, barley, canola, fertilizer and granular were updated due to the changes in the distribution system.

Distribution Uniformity: Distribution uniformity across the seeding width was acceptable in wheat, barley, canola and fertilizer. Distribution uniformity in Avadex Bw and Treflan QR5 was acceptable over the normal range of application rates.

Effect of Field Variables: Field bounce had little effect on metering rates. Field slope and ground speed had only a small effect on metering rates. Distribution uniformity was only slightly affected by field slope.

Grain Damage: Grain damage by the metering and distribution system was within acceptable limits at normal fan speeds for cereal grains but was excessive in canola at normal fan speeds.

Seed Placement: Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was similar to a conventional hoe drill when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. Row spacing and seed band width behind each seed boot provided ample stubble for good windrow support, providing light crops were laid across the rows rather than parallel to them. Good cultivator frame levelling was critical in obtaining a uniform seed depth and subsequent good crop emergence.

Ease of Adjustment and Operation: Seeding rate was sometimes difficult to adjust. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was fair. Tank filling required the use of a drill fill or auger. Twenty-one grease fittings required periodic greasing.

Operator visibility of the cultivator was obstructed by the tanks. The Blanchard 5-Way with Case International 5500 chisel plow could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Rate of Work: The rate of work usually ranged from 19 to 24 ac/hr (7.7 to 9.7 ha/hr). About 100 ac (40 ha) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate. Using only one tank, 70 ac (28 ha) could be seeded before refilling.

Power Requirements: Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, ground speed, cultivator width and soil finishing attachments. In light primary tillage at a 3 in (75 mm) depth and 5 mph (8 km/h), a 146 hp (110 kW) tractor was required to operate the applicator-cultivator combination. In heavy primary tillage, at the same depth and speed, a 165 hp (124 kW) tractor was needed.

Safety: The Blanchard was safe to operate provided normal safety procedures were followed. All moving parts were shielded.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual contained useful information on safety, adjustment, assembly, operations, lubrication and maintenance. A detailed parts list was also included.

Mechanical Problems: A couple of mechanical problems occurred during the evaluation. A number of applicator and distribution system changes were made by the manufacturer to improve distribution and metering.

Summary of Great Plains Model ADC-0285-71 Air Drill (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.44 MB)

Quality of Work: Performance of the Great Plains Model ADC-0285-71 air drill was good for seeding and fertilizer banding in secondary and light primary field conditions. Deep banding fertilizer in heavy primary field conditions was not recommended due to the inability of the air drill to maintain penetration. The Great Plains air drill was suitable for deep banding fertilizer in secondary and light primary field conditions at application rates up to 300 lb/ac (340 kg/ha) at 5.5 mph (9.0 km/h).

Meter Calibrations: The manufacturer's metering system calibration charts were accurate in wheat, barley and canola and were acceptable for fertilizer for both meters.

Distribution Uniformity: Distribution uniformity across the seeding width was acceptable in wheat, barley and fertilizer but was unacceptable in canola.

Effect of Field Variables: Field bounce and ground speed had only a small effect on metering rates, while field slope had a noticeable effect on metering rate. Distribution uniformity was only slightly affected by field slope.

Grain Damage: Grain damage by the metering and distribution system was within acceptable limits for cereals and unacceptable for canola at normal fan speeds.

Seed Placement: Seed placement was good in most conditions. Variation in seed depth was similar to conventional hoe drill, when measured in the same fields under the same seeding conditions. With properly adjusted openers, seed and fertilizer were normally placed in a 1.5 in (38 mm) wide band, with most seeds within 0.5 in (13 mm) of the average seed depth in uniform soil conditions. Each press wheel followed behind an opener, exerting a packing force of 141 lb (627 N), which effectively packed the soil around the seed. Seeding into moist sticky fields resulted in soil build-up on the steel press wheels.

Ease of Adjustment and Operation: Seeding rate was easy and simple to adjust. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was very good. Tank filling required the use of a drill fill or auger. A total of 144 grease zerks on the air till drill required greasing at intervals indicated in the manual.

Since the applicator towed in between the tractor and air drill, visibility of the middle section was obstructed by the tanks.

The Great Plains air drill could be placed into transport position in less than five minutes.

Rate of Work: The rate of work usually ranged from 24.5 to 30 ac/hr (9.9 to 12.1 ha/hr). About 140 ac (56.7 ha) could be seeded before refilling both tanks when seeding wheat at a normal seeding rate. Using only the larger rear tank, 80 ac (32 ha) could be seeded before refilling.

Power Requirements: Tractor size depended on soil conditions, seeding depth, ground speed and soil finishing attachments. In light soil, seeding at a normal seeding depth and 5.5 mph (9 km/h), a 214 hp (160 kW) tractor was needed to operate the Great Plains 45 ft (13.7 m) air drill. In heavier soil conditions, at the same depth and speed, a 227 hp (170 kW) tractor was needed.

Safety: The Great Plains 45 ft (13.7 m) air drill was safe to operate provided normal safety procedures were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was good, containing useful information on adjustment, maintenance and operations. A detailed parts list was also included.

Mechanical Problems: A few mechanical problems occurred during the evaluation. The right cart wheel hub failed twice during the evaluation and an opener was bent and replaced.

Summary of Hooper Seed Brake Boot (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.12 MB)

Quality of Work: Under field conditions there was less variance in seed depth placement when comparing the Hooper Seed Brake Boot to a conventional seed boot. Plant populations were increased an average of 5% with the use of the seed brake. Seed band width was very distinct for the seed brake compared to a conventional seed boot. The air velocity was reduced at the discharge by 52% when using the Seed Brake. This corresponds to a reduction in material velocity of approximately 25%.

Ease of Installation: The installation of the Hooper Seed Brake Boot on a 35 shank cultivator took one man approximately 6 hours.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: The Hooper Seed Brake Boot was trouble free and required no further adjustment providing the boots were properly secured to the shank.

Summary of Cereal Implements Model 1203 Chinook Seeding & Fertilizing System (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.41 MB)

Quality of Work: The Chinook 1203 Model was mounted on a 35 ft (10.7 m) CI 807 heavy duty cultivator. Penetration and seed placement was good in most field conditions. Plants emerged in distinct rows in band widths ranging from 3.2 to 6.2 in (81 to 157 mm). This spacing provided adequate windrow support. When used with the CI 807, there was very good trash clearance.

The grain charts were updated to coincide with the new seed auger. The manufacturer's metering system calibration charts were acceptable for fertilizer. Operating on slopes (up to 10 in), variations in ground speed, fan speed and field bounce had little effect on metering rates. The distribution uniformity and grain damage was acceptable in all materials tested. The maximum fertilizer application rate at 5 mph (8 km/h) was 280 lb/ac (318.2 kg/ha).

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Seeding and fertilizer rates were easy and simple to adjust. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was good. Tank filling required the use of an auger or drill fill. A total of four grease fittings on the applicator required greasing. Since the applicator was towed behind the cultivator, operator visibility of the cultivator was not obstructed by the tanks. The Chinook 1203 with CI 807 heavy duty chisel plow could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes.

Ease of Installation: Ease of installing the distribution and monitoring system was fair. It took two people approximately 12 hours to install the system.

Operator Safety: The Model 1203 Chinook air seeder was safe to operate, provided normal safety procedures were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good, containing useful information on adjustments, maintenance and operations. A detailed parts list was also included.

Mechanical Problems: A number of mechanical problems and manufacturer modifications occurred during the evaluation. When tightening the front meter idler sprocket, the sprocket twisted the idlers support frame. Numerous seed boot deflectors were bent and the support frame for the primary hose was bent.

Summary of Morris Genesis II MA 170 Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.43 MB)

Quality of Work: Seed placement was good but depended largely on the type of seed boot used. Soil finishing was very good. Soil contact pressure beneath the wheels with the tanks full of wheat was less than the soil contact pressure of an unloaded one-half ton truck.

Metering accuracy of the Genesis II MA 170 was good. The metering rates were affected by changes in ground speed and field slope but not by field bounce.

The distribution uniformity was very good for wheat, barley, canola and fertilizer. Little grain damage occurred providing proper fan damper settings were used.

The versatility of the fertilizer banding system was very good. The applicator was capable of single or double shooting. The maximum fertilizer rate obtained by PAMI with 11-51-00 fertilizer when feeding from one tank was 214 lb/ac (240 kg/ha).

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Maintenance of the system was very good with easy access to all lubrication and check points. Ease of filling and cleaning the applicator was good. The optional auger allowed for fast filling and convenient emptying of the tanks. Calibration strips on the inside of the tanks and tank level gauges to view from the tractor were provided. Cleaning large amounts of material out of the tanks was convenient with the clean out system but a vacuum was needed to thoroughly clean the tanks.

Transporting of the applicator and cultivator was good. The auger did interfere with the cyclone in transport position.

The applicator blocked the view of most of the 25 ft (7.6 m) cultivator in the field.

Monitoring the functions of the applicator was fair. No flow monitors were provided for the primary or secondary hoses. Also the motion indicator for the rear meter was not always visible from the tractor.

Ease of setting the seed and fertilizer rates was very good. A slow speed kit was provided for small seeds. Changing from single to double shoot delivery was easy. No scale was provided for the fan damper setting. The MA 170 was equipped with a sample collector used for accurately calibrating the application rate.

Ease of Installation: Ease of mounting the divider heads, the sampler and the clean out cyclone was good. Routing the hoses to the front shanks was difficult. Initial mounting took two men approximately 2 hours.

Power Requirements: The draft and horsepower requirements depended upon the size and type of cultivator used. The operator can expect up to 5% increase in draft due to the applicator cart.

Operator Safety: The MA 170 was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were observed. A safety railing was provided on the tank. The steps to the top of the tank were easy to climb. Lights were also provided. Ear protection was required if working near the engine when running at full rpm.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was good. It contained useful information on adjustments, maintenance and operation.

Mechanical Problems: The radiator would eventually plug and cause the engine to overheat. Hot days with no wind would also cause the engine to overheat. The fan bearing failed, damaging the rotor, near the end of the test.

Summary of Flexi-coil 1100 Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.36 MB)

Quality of Work: The Flexi-coil 1100 distribution system was mounted on a 36 ft (11 m) chisel plow. Seed placement was good in most field conditions. The welded seed boots on 11.8 in spacings resulted in plants emerging in two distinct rows, in band widths ranging from 3.6 to 6.8 in (91 to 173 mm). Soil finishing was very good. Soil contact pressure beneath the wheels with full tanks of wheat was less than the soil contact pressure of an unloaded one-half ton truck.

Metering accuracy of the manufacturer's metering system calibration charts was very good in wheat, barley, canola and fertilizer for both meters. Operating on slopes (up to 10 in), variations in ground speed, fan speed and field bounce had little effect on metering rates.

The distribution uniformity and grain damage was very good in all materials tested. The system was capable of single or double shooting. The maximum fertilizer application rate using one meter at 5 mph (8 km/h) was 200 lb/ac (227 kg/ha). A maximum fertilizer application rate of 258 lb/ac (293 kg/ha) was possible if both meters were used. Higher rates were possible but at unacceptable distribution uniformities.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Maintenance of the system was very good with easy access to all lubrication and check points. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was good. Ease of filling was good and required the use of an auger or drill fill. Since the applicator was towed behind the cultivator, operator visibility was good. The Flexi-coil 1100 air seeder with the Flexi-coil 600 heavy duty chisel plow could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes. Monitoring was good with bin level and fan speed indicators being supplied. Ease of setting the seeding and fertilizer rates was very good.

Ease of Installation: Ease of installing the distribution and monitoring systems was good. It took an experienced operator about 8 hours to install the system. Installation of the double shoot package was best done during initial setup rather than as an add-on option later.

Power Requirements: The draft and horsepower requirements depended upon the size and type of cultivator used. The operator can expect up to 5% increase in draft due to the applicator cart.

Operator Safety: Operation of the Model 1100 was safe provided normal safety procedures were observed. A safety railing was provided on the tank.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good, containing useful information on adjustments, maintenance and operations. A detailed parts list and assembly manual was also included.

Mechanical Problems: The mechanical problems included the rubbing of the primary hoses on the front applicator tire and the rubbing of the electrical harness and hydraulic lines on the front pivot point.

Summary of Flexi-coil 1600 Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.42 MB)

Quality of Work: The Flexi-coil 1600 distribution system was mounted on a 36 ft (11 m) chisel plow. Seed placement was good in most field conditions. The welded seed boots on 11.8 in (300 mm) spacing resulted in plants emerging in two distinct rows, in band widths ranging from 3.6 to 6.8 in (91 to 173 mm). Soil finishing was very good. Soil contact pressure beneath the wheels with full tanks of wheat was less than the soil contact pressure of an unloaded one-half ton truck.

Metering accuracy of the manufacturer's metering system calibration charts was very good in wheat, barley, canola and fertilizer for both meters. Operating on slopes (up to 10 in), variations in ground speed, fan speed and field bounce had little effect on metering rates.

The distribution uniformity and grain damage was very good in all materials tested. The system was capable of single or double shooting. The maximum fertilizer application rate using one or both meters at 5 mph (8 km/h) was 282 lb/ac (320 kg/ha). Higher rates were possible but at unacceptable distribution uniformities.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Maintenance of the system was very good with easy access to all lubrication and check points. Tank and meter clean-out convenience was good. Ease of filling was good and required the use of an auger or drill fill. Since the applicator was towed behind the cultivator, operator visibility was good. The Flexi-coil 1600 air seeder with the Flexi-coil 600 heavy duty chisel plow could be placed in transport position in less than five minutes. Monitoring was good with bin level and fan speed indicators being supplied. Ease of setting the seeding and fertilizer rates was very good.

Ease of Installation: Ease of installing the distribution and monitoring systems was good. It took an experienced operator about 8 hours to install the system. Installation of the double shoot package was best done during initial setup rather than as an add-on option later.

Power Requirements: The draft and horsepower requirements depended upon the size and type of cultivator used. The operator can expect up to 5% increase in draft due to the applicator cart.

Operator Safety: Operation of the Model 1600 was safe provided normal safety procedures were observed. A safety railing was provided on the tank.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good, containing useful information on adjustments, maintenance and operations. A detailed parts list and assembly manual was also included.

Mechanical Problems: The mechanical problems included the rubbing of the primary hoses on the front applicator tire and the rubbing of the electrical harness and hydraulic lines on the front pivot point.

Summary of Cereal Implements Model 1150 Pneumatic Distribution System (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.37 MB)

Quality of Work: The CI 1150 pneumatic distribution system was mounted on a 25 ft (7.6 m) chisel plow which maintained adequate penetration and seed placement providing good emergence in moist field conditions. Plants emerged in distinct rows in band widths ranging from 3.2 to 6.2 in (81 to 157 mm). This spacing provided adequate windrow support providing light crops were laid across the rows rather than parallel to them.

Accuracy of the manufacturer's metering system calibration charts was fair in wheat, barley, canola and fertilizer. Measured rates were up to 18.5% high. Operating on slopes (up to 10 in), variations in fan speed and field bounce had little effect on metering rates. Variations in ground speed increased the seeding rate by as much as twenty percent. The distribution uniformity was good in all materials tested. Grain damage was acceptable in canola. The maximum fertilizer application rate at 5 mph (8 km/h) was 307 lb/ac (348 kg/ha).

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of setting the seeding and fertilizer rates was poor. Tank and meter cleanout convenience was good. Tank filling required the use of an auger or drill fill. A total of eight grease fittings on the applicator required greasing. With the applicator being mounted on the cultivator, operator visibility of the cultivator's main frame section was fair. The C11150 and CI 806 heavy duty chisel plow could be placed into transport position in less than five minutes.

Ease of Installation: Ease of installing the hopper, fan and housing, meter drive wheel, distribution and monitoring system was good. It took one person approximately 8 hours to install the system.

Operator Safety: Operation of the CI 1150 pneumatic distribution system was safe provided normal safety procedures were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual and parts list was updated during the evaluation. The new operator's manual was good, containing useful information on adjustments, maintenance and operation.

Mechanical Problems: A number of manufacturer modifications occurred during the evaluation.

Summary of Vern Seed Boot and Banding Knife (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.12 MB)

Quality of Work: Penetration of the Vern Banding Knife was fair. In primary conditions, with hard soil, the backswept banding knives would ride out. Penetration was good in conditions with adequate moisture.

Seed placement of the Vern Seed Boot was good. Seed was normally placed in a double band width of 5.0 in (127 mm) with most seeds within 0.4 in (10 mm) of the average seed depth in uniform soil conditions.

Fertilizer placement of the Vern Banding Knife was fair. The fertilizer was placed below and centered between the seed rows in an average bandwidth of 0.5 in (13 mm). Average depth below the seed was 1.2 in (30 mm) but was less under certain operating conditions.

The Vern Seed Boot and Banding Knife did not affect the soil finishing and trash clearance characteristics of the test cultivator and was rated as very good. A harrow packer drawbar was used as a post seeding operation.

Operation of the Vern Banding Knife in stony conditions was very good. No damage occurred to the knives during the test.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: No depth adjustment was provided on the Vern Seed Boot or Banding Knife for the seed or fertilizer.

Plugging of the seed boot or fertilizer boot was not a problem during the test.

The attachment had no effect on the transportation of the cultivator.

Power Requirements: Draft (drawbar pull) requirements depended on depth, field preparation, ground speed, soil type and moisture content. In primary conditions a 16 in (406 mm) sweep with the Vern Knife pulled 12 to 18% heavier than without the knife attached.

Maximum tractor power requirements in primary conditions for one Vern Banding Knife with a 16 in (406 mm) sweep ranged from 4.7 to 7.2 power-take-off hp (3.5 to 5.4 kw).

Ease of Installation: Ease of installing the Vern Seed Boot and Banding Knife was very good. The seed boot fit up to a 1.5 in (38 mm) diameter hose and the fertilizer boot required a 1.25 in (31.8 mm) diameter hose.

Operator Safety: The Vern Seed Boots and Banding Knives presented no safety hazard if normal safety precaution were observed.

Operator's Manual: No operator's manual was provided.

Mechanical History: No major mechanical problems occurred during the test. The banding knives were worn out after 48 acres (19 ha) per knife.

Summary of Victory Seed-A-Vator (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 1.94 MB)

Quality of Work: Penetrating ability was very good in all the test field conditions.

Seed and fertilizer placements were good. At reasonable travel and fan speeds, the seed was placed in distinct paired rows 5 in (127 mm) apart. The fertilizer was placed between the paired rows of seed and at the same depth as the seed.

Soil finishing was very good. When seeding into an untilled stubble field, the majority of the straw was left on the surface with some of it standing. The packing force was adequate for the soils and conditions encountered during the test.

Trash clearance was good. Plugging would occur at the rod weeder and packers if the tillage depth was not deep enough to hold the rod weeder in the ground.

Operation in stony conditions was good. Maximum lift height of the shanks supplied was 6.5 in (165 mm).

Metering accuracy in wheat, canola and fertilizer were good. The manufacturer did not supply a chart for barley. Differences between the manufacturer's and AFMRC's metering calibrations were attributed to the difference in seed size and density. Left and right sideslopes increased the rates by 13% and decreased the rates by 12% with wheat and 11-51-00 fertilizer, respectively.

The distribution uniformity was fair. The distribution uniformity was within the acceptable limits for wheat, barley and canola but not for lower rates of 11-51-00 fertilizer. A 15 slope in wheat and fertilizer gave unacceptable distribution uniformities.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of performing routine maintenance was good. Most of the 46 grease fittings were accessible without much difficulty.

Ease of filling and cleaning was fair. No auger was supplied. Small tank openings made fillings difficult and messy. Cleaning large amounts of material out of the tanks was difficult. Moisture infiltrated the fertilizer tank during the test.

Ease of transporting was fair. The rod weeder had to be disassembled in two places to put the wings in transport position. No transport lock was provided for the ground engaging metering drive wheel. The unit required the use of a tractor with four sets of remote hydraulics. Caution had to be used when transporting the unit because of the wide transport width. Maneuverability in the field was hampered by the long hitch length.

Monitoring was good. An acremeter was supplied, but did not read directly in acres. There was no monitor for rod weeder speed.

Ease of changing the seed and fertilizer rates was fair. Removing and installing the sprockets was difficult because of the tight fit on the shafts. Ease of setting the seeding depth was good.

Power Requirements: Power-take-off (PTO) horsepower draft requirements varied from 145 hp (109 kW) to 187 hp (140 kW). PTO horsepower requirements to run the rod weeder and the centrifugal fan were 3.1 hp (2.3 kW) and 17.7 hp (13.2 kW), respectively. The overall tractor size needed to operate the test unit varied from 166 PTO hp (124.5 kvv) to 208 PTO hp (156 kW).

Operator Safety: The unit was safe to operate but precautions had to be taken to ensure operator safety as no railing was provided on the applicator tank.

Operator's Manual: A general operator's manual was not provided but one was provided for the rod weeder.

Mechanical History: Several rod weeder bearings and universal joint connectors and two drives were replaced during the test. The fasteners used required tightening during the test.

Summary of Flexi-coil 5000 Air Drill (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 1.03 MB)

Quality of Work: Penetration of the Flexi-coil 5000 with the adjustable floating hoes was very good. The openers penetrated hard soils and shallow tilled fields. Optional spacer blocks were available to lower those openers following in tire tracks.

The seed and fertilizer placement was very good. Seed and fertilizer were placed together in the furrows. Band width of the placed seed and fertilizer depended on the fan speed of the pneumatic delivery system. Variation in seed and fertilizer depth remained uniform when seeding in either tilled or untilled soil.

Soil finishing was very good. The majority of the straw was left on the surface with some remaining upright when operating in untilled stubble conditions. The packing force was adequate for the soils and conditions encountered during the test.

Trash clearance was very good. The four rows of hoe openers allowed good trash flow but plugged occasionally in heavy, wet straw conditions.

The quality of the mark left by the marking system was fair. The mark left in untilled fields was usually not visible from the tractor cab. The disc on the marker was not aggressive enough to make a visible mark in trash or untilled field conditions.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of performing routine maintenance on the Flexi-coil 5000 was good. Most grease fittings were accessible without much difficulty. One person required 30 minutes to service the 71 weekly grease fittings.

Ease of transporting was very good. Caution was required when transporting the unit because of the high transport height.

The unit towed well at speeds up to 18 mph (29 km/h). The test unit as equipped with end-markers required the use of three sets of remote hydraulics. The short hitch allowed the unit to trail directly behind the tractor with very responsive turning.

Ease of operating and adjusting the marking system was good. The unit was equipped with an end marker on each side. The markers were operated from the tractor using a remote hydraulic circuit.

Ease of setting the seeding depth was very good. The seeding depth was controlled by the two hydraulic cylinders located on the back of the unit. Levelling the frame initially, was time consuming.

Power Requirements: Overall tractor size needed to pull the test unit at normal seeding depths and at 5 mph (8 km/h) varied from 193 pto hp (144 pto kW) to 254 pto hp (190 pto kW).

Operator Safety: The Flexi-coil 5000 Air Drill was safe to operate when normal safety precautions were observed. Accommodations for a safety tow chain were provided but the chain was not provided. The manufacturer offers the chain as an option.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manuals were very good. A separate manual for the Endmarker was provided. The manuals were clearly written, with photographs and illustrations for explanations.

Mechanical History: The hoe point openers were worn out after 2130 ac (850 ha) or 33 ac (13 ha) per point.

Summary of Bourgault 2155 II Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 1.11 MB)

Quality of Work: The seed placement of the Bourgault 2155 II Air Seeder depended largely on the careful levelling of the cultivator frame and the type of seed boot used. Band width of the rows averaged 2.0 in (51 mm) in width. Metering accuracy of the 2155 II was very good. The metering rates for cereal grains, fertilizer, Treflan and Avadex were slightly affected by decreases in ground speed below 5 mph (8 km/h) and field side slope. The maximum 11-51-0 fertilizer application rate from the rear meter was 198 lb/ac (222 kg/ha).

The distribution uniformity was very good in wheat, barley, peas and canola. Rates of 11-51-0 fertilizer greater than 240 lb/ac (270 kg/ha) produced unacceptable distribution uniformities. Spreading uniformity was good in Avadex and Treflan. Increasing the spreader height increased the coefficient of variation (CV) spreading uniformity in Treflan. Insignificant seed damage occurred providing proper fan speed settings were used.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Maintenance of the system was very good with easy access to all lubrication points. Ease of filling and cleaning the applicator was very good. The optional auger allowed for fast filling and convenient emptying of the tanks. The applicator and cultivator were placed into transport position in five minutes. Since the applicator towed behind the cultivator, operator visibility was good.

Monitoring was very good with bin level, auger rotation and fan speed sensors supplied. Ease of setting the seeding, fertilizer and granular rates was very good. A slow speed sprocket for the rear auger was supplied. The 2155 II Air Seeder was equipped with an electronic calibration acreage meter and calibration boxes used for calibrating the application rate.

Ease of Installation: Ease of installing the distribution and monitoring systems was good. Installation of the systems took two experienced operators 8 hours. Installation of the granular distribution system was more convenient during initial setup rather than as an add-on option later. Installation of the granular system took an experienced operator 8 hours. Installation of only the distribution piping to the main air stream took the operator 45 minutes. Experienced operators would take less time.

Power Requirements: The draft and horsepower requirements depended upon the size and type of cultivator used. Power-take-off horsepower requirements to pull the applicator full of wheat in tilled loam soil ranged from 15.7 hp (11.7 kW) to 24.9 hp (18,6 kW). Average and maximum horsepower requirements for the centrifugal fan were 14.4 hp (10.7 kW) and 19.3 hp (14.4 kW).

Operator Safety: The Model 2155 was safe to operate if normal precautions were observed. Access ladders were provided for each side of the applicator and safety hand rails were provided for the lower and upper platforms. The tank lids were equipped with safety latches which prevented the lids from opening completely when the main latches were released.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was good, containing useful information on adjustments, maintenance and operation. A distribution assembly manual and granular ~hment manual were also provided.

Mechanical Problems: Four grease nipples on the sprocket shafts, the front bin sensor and the tank lid seals were replaced.

Summary of Morris 6130 Air Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.75 MB)

Quality of Work: The seed placement of the Morris 6130 air seeder depended on the levelling of the cultivator frame and the seed boot used. Paired row band width with the wide spread seed boot averaged 2.5 in (64 mm), leaving 3.0 in (76 mm) between rows. Metering accuracy was very good. The metering rates for cereal grains, canola, peas and fertilizer were not affected by field variables. The maximum 11-51-0 fertilizer application rate was 205 lb/ac (230 kg/ha) from the rear meter using the standard metershaft sprocket. Higher application rates were possible using the high rate metershaft sprocket.

The distribution uniformity was very good in wheat, barley, canola and 11-51-0 fertilizer. Distribution uniformity of peas was good. Distribution uniformity in 11-51-0 fertilizer was acceptable over the full range of application rates. Travelling on a 15 right side slope raised the coefficient of variation from 6.3 to 11.4% with wheat and from 6.8 to 12.3% with fertilizer. Insignificant seed damage occurred providing proper fan speed settings were used.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Maintenance of the system was very good. Daily lubrication took five minutes. Ease of filling and cleaning the applicator was very good. The optional auger allowed for fast filling and convenient emptying of the tanks. The trailing telescoping hitch allowed for easy hook-up of the applicator. The applicator and cultivator were placed into transport position in five minutes. The main drive chain was easily removed disabling the metering system for transport.

Monitoring was very good. Fan speed, metershaft rotation, bin level and ground speed sensors were supplied. Ease of setting the application rate was very good. The slider plates were set before material was placed into the tanks. The unit was equipped with a spring scale, calibration chart and rate check box used for calibrating the application rate. A hand crank allowed for easy turning of the metering system during calibration.

Ease of Installation: Ease of installing the distribution and monitoring system was good. Installation of the systems took two experienced people seven hours. Initial set-up of the metering assemblies was completed by the manufacturer.

Power Requirements: The draft and horsepower requirements depended upon the size and type of cultivator used. Power-take-off horsepower requirements to pull the applicator full of wheat in tilled loam soil ranged from 14.3 hp (10.7 kW) to 24.7 hp (18.4 kW). Average and maximum homepower requirements for the centrifugal fan were 10.9 hp (8.1 kW) and 18.1 hp (13.5 kW), respectively.

Operator Safety: The Model 6130 was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were observed. A fold-down ladder, side handrails and a walk-through platform were provided for safe access to the applicator tanks. A safety chain was provided to secure the applicator to the applicator hitch.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. The manual contained useful information on safety, operation, maintenance and trouble shooting. An applicator set-up section was also provided.

Mechanical Problems: No mechanical problems were encountered during the test.

Summary of Conserva Pak CP Series Seeder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.28 MB)

Agronomic Performance: Seedling response was rapid and even in all direct seeding soil conditions. Fertilizer response was positive.

Quality of Work: Penetration was excellent for the fertilizer openers and good for the seed openers. The fertilizer openers penetrated well in all conditions. The seed openers also penetrated well provided that the fertilizer openers were at least 3.5 in (88 mm) deep. Seed and fertilizer placement was very good. Seed and fertilizer separation was maintained. Variations in seed depth were minimal when seeding in unworked stubble.

Soil finishing was very good. The majority of straw was left on the surface while direct seeding into standing stubble. Reduced ground speeds reduced trash burial, while placing fertilizer deeper increased trash burial.

Trash clearance was good. The four rows of openers allowed good trash flow in fairly evenly spread, heavy and dry straw. Seeding at an angle to the stubble rows in damp heavy straw improved trash clearance. Long unanchored damp straw tended to wrap on the fertilizer shanks.

Operation in stony conditions was fair. Many fertilizer points and one shank broke during the test. Maximum lift height of the fertilizer opener was 9 in (229 mm).

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of performing routine maintenance was good. Most grease fittings were accessible without much difficulty. Daily servicing took 10 minutes, while weekly servicing took 30 minutes.

Ease of transporting was very good. The machine was placed in transport in less than ten minutes. Installing the depth control hydraulic cylinder locks were inconvenient as it required climbing on the seeder frame. The wheel tread in transport was narrow so care was required when transporting on steep side slopes.

Ease of maneuvering in field position was good. When used with the Valcon DS 160 tow between seed cart, extremely sharp turns had to be avoided to prevent the seed cart tires from hitting the frame of the seeder. The view of the centre frame, where plugging usually occurred, was blocked by the tow between cart.

Ease of setting the seed and fertilizer depth was fair. The seed depth could be independently adjusted from the fertilizer depth. Adjustment for packing force and lateral spacing between the seed and fertilizer were also provided. These adjustments were very time consuming, although only limited readjustment was necessary after initial setting.

Power Requirements: The overall tractor size needed to pull the 33 ft (10 m) wide Conserva Pak seeder at normal fertilizer and seed depths at 5 mph (8 km/h) ranged from 130 to 162 hp (97 to 121 kW). Additional power was required for the seed tank.

Operator Safety: The Conserva Pak was safe to operate when the precautions in the operator's manual and normal safety practices were observed. The seeder should be parked on a level area before placing the unit into or out of transport position.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. The manual was clearly written with supportive pictures and illustrations.

Mechanical History: Some shank assembly frame welds cracked and many fertilizer points broke.

Summary of Case IH 8500 Air Hoe Drill (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 1.08 MB)

Quality of Work: Penetration of the Case IH 8500 with the spring trip hoe openers was very good. The six section frame allowed the drill to follow the contour of the land very well except in sharp gullies or hills.

The seed and fertilizer placement was very good. Variation in seed and fertilizer depth was uniform when seeding in either tilled or untilled soil.

Soil finishing was very good. The majority of the stubble was left standing after seeding into untitled stubble field conditions. The packing force was adequate for the soils and conditions encountered during the test.

Residue clearance was good. Plugging occurred in fields with high amounts of straw, high standing stubble or weed infestations.

Operation in stony conditions was very good. Maximum trip height for the shank assembly ranged from 7 to 9 in (178 to 229 mm).

Metering accuracy was good. Fertilizer flowed by the meters on a 15 downhill slope. Travelling on a 15 uphill slope caused a 23% decrease in the metering rate of 11-51-0 fertilizer. Uniformity of distribution of the application rates was good. The coefficient of variation (CV) ranged from 6.5 to 10.5% depending on the rate and material.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of performing routine maintenance was fair. One hour was required to lubricate the 129 grease fittings on the unit.

Ease of filling and cleaning was fair. A drill fill or grain auger was needed to fill the tanks. The tank openings were not covered by a screen to prevent blockages in the distribution system. The centre of the seed tank emptied faster than the sides due to the position of the tank supports.

Cleaning large amounts of seed or fertilizer out of the tanks was difficult. Moisture leaked in and around the fertilizer meters causing fertilizer to cake after a rain.

Ease of transporting was very good. Five minutes were required to place the unit into transport position. Caution was required when transporting the unit on public roads. The unit required the use of a tractor with two sets of remote hydraulics, a 1000 rpm power take-off and a seven pin electrical connection.

Monitoring was very good. The electronic monitoring system monitored fan speed, front and rear tank levels, shaft rotation, seed and fertilizer blockage.

Ease of setting the application rate for seed and fertilizer was very good. The unit was calibrated by removing the primary hoses behind the tank and attaching sacks to collect the material.

Ease of setting the seeding depth was good. The seeding depth was set at the left master cylinder by adjusting the hydraulic depth stop. The unit was then levelled front to back by adjusting the height of the packer wheel assemblies.

Power Requirements: Average power-take-off horsepower requirements to run the hydraulic system ranged from 16 to 30 hp (12 to 23 kW). The overall tractor size needed to operate the test unit varied from 188 to 226 PTO hp (141 to 170 PTO kW).

Operator Safety: The unit was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were observed. A wide platform with railing provided easy access to the tank opening.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. The manual was clearly written with photographs and illustrations for explanations.

Mechanical History: Numerous fasteners and hydraulic fittings were tightened during the first part of the test. The clutch switch sliding bar bent and was replaced five times during the test.

Summary of Morris Maxim Air Drill (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.32 MB)

Quality of Work: Penetration of the Morris Maxim air drill with edge-on shanks was very good. The openers were able to maintain proper depth in fields which contained areas of hard soil. Four mounting positions were possible for the opener and seed boot assembly. The 390 lb (1.7 kN) shank trip force minimized tripping of the shank assembly.

Seed and fertilizer placement was very good. The seed and fertilizer were placed together in the furrows. The band width of the rows averaged 1.8 in (46 mm). Seed and fertilizer depth remained uniform when seeding in either tilled or untilled soil.

Soil finishing was very good. The majority of the straw was left on the soil surface with some remaining upright when working in untilled soil conditions. The packing force was adequate for the soils and conditions encountered during the test.

Residue Clearance was very good. The four rows of hoe openers allowed good residue flow. Variation in opener spacing caused occasional plugging in the main frame.

Operation in stony conditions was very good. Maximum lift height of the edge-on shank was 10 in (254 mm). Rocks 5 to 6 in (127 to 152 mm) in diameter occasionally jammed between the press wheels.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of performing routine maintenance on the Morris Maxim air drill was very good. The 36 grease fittings were serviced by one person in 20 minutes. Replacing the hoe point openers required four hours and changing the position of the openers and seed boots required two hours.

Ease of transporting was very good. Caution was required when transporting because of the width and height of the unit. The drill towed well at speeds up to 20 mph (32 km/h). A sweep-to-ground clearance of 6.5 in (165 mm) allowed for safe transportation.

Ease of levelling the frame was good. Turnbuckles levelled each drill frame section. Shims on the press wheel pivot brackets levelled the unit laterally.

Ease of setting the seeding depth was very good. The seeding depth was controlled by four hydraulic cylinders. Stroke control collars on each cylinder were manually set to change the seed depth. Keeping the cylinders phased helped maintain uniform seeding depth.

Power Requirements: Overall tractor size needed to pull the 39 ft (11.9 m) test unit at normal seeding depths and at 5 mph (8 kin/h) vaned from 143 to 236 PTO hp (107 to 176 PTO kW).

Operator Safety: The Morris Maxim air drill was safe to operate when normal safety precautions were observed. A slow moving vehicle sign, safety reflectors and hitch safety chain were provided as standard equipment.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. A separate assembly manual was also provided. The manuals were clearly written, with photographs and illustrations for explanations.

Mechanical History: Interference occurred between the right wing and main frame press wheel gangs when unfolding the unit. The right wing truss support member cracked and four wing depth control hydraulic lines were damaged during the test.

Summary of K-Hart Double Disk Direct Seeding Unit (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.13 MB)

Quality of Work: Penetration of the K-Hart Double Disk direct seeding unit was good, The double disks occasionally rode out in hard untilled soils. Toolbar weight required during the test for adequate penetration of the disks was 400 lb (180 kg) per unit.

Seed and fertilizer placement was good. Seed and fertilizer were placed together in the furrows. Variation in seed and fertilizer depth was uniform when two smooth disks were used. Depth varied when notched disks were used on a unit. In very hard soils the parallel linkage allowed the disks to move from side to side.

Soil finishing was very good. Soil and residue disturbance was very low. The packing force was adequate for the soils and conditions encountered during the test. The narrow packer was the most suitable packer during the field test.

Residue clearance was very good. The disks cut through straw at deep seeding depths in hard soil. Hairpinning of straw occurred at shallow seeding depths or in soft moist soils. Operation in stony conditions was very good. No damage occurred to the units during the test.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of setting the disk pressure, packing force and seeding depth was good. Adjustments were made to individual units. Wrenches were required to perform the adjustments.

Power Requirements: The tractor size needed to operate each unit varied from 1 to 2.9 PTO hp (0.8 to 2.2 PTO kW). Maximum tractor size needed to operate each unit was 3.9 PTO hp (2.9 PTO kW).

Operator Safety: The K-Hart seeding unit was safe to use if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: An operator's manual was not provided with the units.

Mechanical History: The average wear of the notched disks was twice the average wear of the smooth disks. The back offset disk of each unit wore a groove on the inside of the front disk.

Summary of K-Hart Coulter (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.15 MB)

Quality of Work: Penetration of the K-Hart Coulter was very good. The coulter did not ride out of the ground except in very hard soil such as wheel tracks.

Fertilizer placement was good. Variation in fertilizer depth was uniform when soil conditions were uniform. The adjustable arm for the fertilizer attachment minimized but did not prevent soil surface fertilizer placement.

Soil finishing was very good. Soil disturbance of the coulter blades was very low.

Residue clearance was very good. The coulter blade cut through residue in firm soil and dry residue. Operation in stony conditions was very good. Maximum trip clearance of the coulter was 6 in (152 mm).

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of maintenance was very good. The coulters required
regular lubrication at 2 pivot points.

Ease of setting the operating depth was good. The depth was set by vertically sliding the shank in the frame mount. The coulters were lowered as far as possible during field testing. The tine depth was set with an adjustable arm. The tine angle was adjusted with a slotted hole located in the tine mounting support. Wrenches were required for all depth settings.

Power Requirements: The tractor size needed to operate 1 coulter at 5 mph (8 km/h) varied from 1.2 to 2.7 PTO hp (0.9 to 2 PTO kW). Maximum tractor size needed to operate each coulter at 5 mph (8 km/h) was 3.1 PTO hp (2.3 PTO kW).
1. A grease nipple was installed on hub assembly.
2. Lubrication points were eliminated at 2 pivot points. One was replaced by using a chrome pin and nylon bushing.
3. A better type of dust cap was used on the hub assembly to eliminate the cap from being knocked off by stones.

Operator Safety: The coulter was safe to use if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: An operator’s manual was not provided with the coulters.

Mechanical History: Several nuts were tightened on the adjustable arm for the fertilizer tine depth during the test.

Summary of Flexi-coil 1720 Air Cart (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 1.02 MB)

Quality of Work: The seed and fertilizer placement of the Flexi-coil 1720 air cart depended on careful levelling of the Flexi-coil 820 cultivator frame and the seed boot or opener used. The band width with the narrow seed/banding boot averaged 2.2 in (56 mm) using the 3 in (76 mm) Nok-On mini-sweep and 2.3 in (58 mm) with the 11 in (279 mm) Nok-On sweep, leaving an average spacing of 6.7 in (170 mm) between rows. Seed and fertilizer depth was uniform when seeding in either tilled or untilled soil.

Soil finishing with the v-shape molded plastic packers was very good for the soil conditions encountered. The packer’s downward pressure was set for varying soil conditions by the location of the top pin and spring length of the packer/harrow mounting arm. Coverage by the packers was even with ridge depths ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 in
(38 to 58 mm) depending on soil conditions. The metering rates for cereal grains, canola, peas and fertilizer were not affected by field variables. The maximum 11-51-0 fertilizer application rate was 280 lb/ac (314 kg/ha) from the rear metre using the coarse metre roller. Higher application rates were possible using both metres. The distribution uniformity was very good in wheat, barley, peas, canola and 11-51-0 fertilizer. Distribution uniformity in 11-51-0 fertilizer was acceptable at application rates below 475 lb/ac (532 kg/ha). Travelling on a 10o uphill slope raised the Coefficient of Variation (CV) from 4.5 to 6.0 percent with wheat and from 4.3 to 8.0 percent with fertilizer. Insignificant seed damage occurred providing proper fan speed settings were used.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Maintenance of the system was very good. Daily inspection included checking for air leaks, plugged hoses, movement of the spring-loaded chain tension idlers and wheel bolt tightness. Ease of filling and cleaning the applicator was very good. The auger allowed for fast filling and convenient emptying of the tanks. Ease of transporting the applicator was very good. The pivot link mounting brackets mounted on the cultivator frame allowed for easy hook-up of the applicator hitch to the cultivator. The applicator and cultivator were placed into transport position in 5 minutes. The master clutch disabled the metering system for transport.

Monitoring was very good. Fan speed, air velocity speed, metre shaft rotation, bin level and area/ground speed sensors were supplied. Ease of adjusting the arm on the optional packer/harrows was good. Three working positions were supplied for the top pin, while spring length could be varied between 8.5 and 13.0 in (216 and
330 mm). Ease of setting the application rate was very good. The roller speed was set by changing the slide setting. The unit was equipped with a density scale, spring scale, calibration chart and rate check bags used for calibrating the application rate.

Power Requirements: The draft and horsepower requirements depended upon the size and type of tillage unit used. Power take-off horsepower requirements to pull the applicator full of wheat in tilled loam soil ranged from 16.3 to 28.8 hp (12.2 to 21.5 kW). Average and maximum hydraulic horsepower requirements for the centrifugal fan were 9.8 and 17.6 hp (7.3 and 13.1 kW), respectively.

Operator Safety: The Model 1720 was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were observed. The rear ladder, side handrails and rear platform provided safe access to the applicator tanks. The front arm lock and rear over-centred latch secured the loading auger into transport position while a safety chain was provided to secure the applicator to the applicator hitch.

Operator's Manual: The operator’s manual was very good. The manual contained useful information on safety, operation, maintenance and trouble shooting. Applicator service and assembly manuals were also provided, including a partial parts list.

Mechanical History: The secondary and primary distribution hoses were damaged during the test.

 
 
 
 
For more information about the content of this document, contact Lawrence Papworth.
This document is maintained by Marlene Friesen.
This information published to the web on February 14, 2002.
Last Reviewed/Revised on February 28, 2014.