Canola Grading

 
  From the July 31, 2017 Issue of Agri-News
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 The unusually large amount of spring harvested canola this year has some producers concerned about grading when marketing their crop.

“There has been not only a large variation on the canola quality, particularly for spring-threshed canola, but there is also a large variation in the way buyers are perceiving that quality,” says Neil Blue, provincial crop market analyst, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Edmonton.

One of the determinants of canola quality is seed damage.

“Damage is assessed by observing the result of crushing canola seeds with a roller,” says Blue. “Producers are familiar with a common form of damage, that being distinctly green seeds. However, some canola seeds overwintered in the fields incurred damage in the form of inside seed colour change from a bright yellow to darker yellow to tan or brown color. Like the assessment of green seed count, the assessment of other damage is subjective, based on the judgment of the grader.”

This year, says Blue, in part due to the strong demand and relatively tight supply of canola, the outside appearance of the canola seed has had little influence on the grading. “Because of this, you should shop your samples around widely, preferably after obtaining a grade on a representative sample from an objective source, such as the Canadian Grain Commission.”

Most (but not all) buyers follow the Canadian Grain Commission grading standards. Those standards allow a maximum green count and maximum total damage level for each grade.

  • #1 canola can have a maximum of 2% green count and 5% total damage
  • #2 canola can have a maximum of 6% green count and maximum of 12% total damage
  • #3 canola can have maximum 20% green and 25% total damage
The Canadian Grain Commission supplies colour cards to use as reference in assessing both green count and other damage.

“Most buyers will have these grading standards in their facility’s grading room. Also, the entire grain grading guide is available on the Canadian Grain Commission website at www.grainscanada.gc.ca. The Canada Grain Commission can also provide grading of crop samples on request. As well, the Harvest Sample Program provides free grading of crop samples in the fall. This program is a great mechanism for producers to get a base grade for their crop sample to use in shopping their crop around to prospective buyers.”

For more information, contact the Ag-Info Centre at 310-FARM (3276). Blue also has a list of crop buyers that is available on request from 780-422-4053 or by e-mail at neil.blue@gov.ab.ca.

Contact:
Neil Blue
780-422-4053
 
 
 
 
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For more information about the content of this document, contact Neil Blue.
This document is maintained by Ken Blackley.
This information published to the web on July 20, 2017.