Guide to Field Experimentation: Reporting

 
 
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 Applied research and demonstration projects require formal reporting either at project completion or at intervals during the project. Report timing and format are usually specified by the agency funding the project. Most report formats include the following information:
  • Abstract or Summary - Briefly summarize the project, usually in half a page or less. Highlight results or progress to date, including any significant deviations from the original objectives.
  • Background and Objectives - Explain the need for the project and state its purpose.
  • Methods - Outline the project design and any significant details of the procedures used. Provide enough detail so others could repeat your experiment if desired.
  • Results - For final reports, describe the project results. For interim reports, summarize the work completed to date. Be objective when reporting your results; don't try to make them fit a preconceived conclusion. Measurements (e.g., yields, weight gains, weed populations, etc.) should be included. Results may be presented in tables or graphs. An example of a table is shown below.
  • Conclusions - State whether or not the project's objectives were met. State any factors that contributed to the project outcome. Describe any formal or informal evaluations of the awareness phase of the project, assess this phase and summarize ideas for improving future projects.
Example of a table presenting project results:

Table 1 Crop yields by rotation and tillage type, 1989

Crop Yield
Rotation
Tillage Type
(kg/ha)
(bu/ac)
Statistical
Significance*
Continuously Cropped Conventional Tillage
944
14
a
Continuously Cropped Minimum Tillage
1062
16
a
Continuously Cropped Zero Tillage
1550
23
b
Crop-Fallow Conventional Tillage
2735
41
c
Crop-Fallow Minimum Tillage
2501
38
c
Crop-Fallow Zero Tillage
2739
41
c
* yields followed by the same letter do not differ significantly, based on unpaired-test (P<0.05).
 
 
 
 

Other Documents in the Series

 
  Guide to Field Experimentation
Guide to Field Experimentation: Planning a Field Experiment
Guide to Field Experimentation: Experimental Design
Guide to Field Experimentation: Site Location
Guide to Field Experimentation: Project Implementation
Guide to Field Experimentation: Data Collection
Guide to Field Experimentation: Awareness and Technology Transfer
Guide to Field Experimentation: Evaluating Effectiveness of Awareness
Guide to Field Experimentation: Reporting - Current Document
Guide to Field Experimentation: Summary and Conclusions
Appendix: Examples of Applied Research and Demonstration Topics
 
 
 
 
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For more information about the content of this document, contact Len Kryzanowski.
This document is maintained by Nicole Huggins-Rawlins.
This information published to the web on February 11, 2002.
Last Reviewed/Revised on January 22, 2014.