Bale Transporters

 
 
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20 Hesston 5200 Round-up Multiple Bale Mover
21 Farmhand Model F126-B Five-Bale Mover
22 New Holland Model 85 Bale Handler
23 B & K Bale Karrier 815
24 McKee Bale-Rustler
137 Kirchner Model 70 Automatic Bale Wagon
138 Sperry New Holland 1033 Automatic Bale Wagon
305 Sperry New Holland 8500 Round Bale Wagon
485 Massey Ferguson 505 Round Bale Mover
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493 Forster Model 40 Round Bale Mover
516 Morris M-881 Hay Hiker Round Bale Mover
522 Laurier H4250 Round Bale Mover
536 Mumby Round Bale Mover
548 Knudson Square Bale Stacker and Mover
593 Laurier H2125 Round Bale Mover
674 Kingsman RBM - 217 Round Bale Mover
Summary of Hesston 5200 Round-up Multiple Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.22 MB)

The functional performance of the Hesston 5200 Round-up multiple bale mover was very good for retrieval of large round bales from the field and transport to the storage area.

The Hesston 5200 handled firm bales effectively. Four large round bales could easily be loaded but if the average bale weight was greater than 680 kg (1500 lb), the manufacturer's maximum load rating for the wagon could be exceeded. If bale length was greater than 1500 mm (5 ft) considerable overhang occurred with four bales on the bed rails. Operator experience was required for bales to be loaded and unloaded in a continuous, uniform and orderly manner.

The Hesston 5200 towed very well, when fully loaded, at speeds up to 29 km/h (18 mph). The swing tongue facilitated safe road transport and ease of maneuvering in confined areas.

The overall durability was very good but was reduced by the repeated stretching of the bed rail chains.

In average field conditions it took an experienced operator four minutes to load four bales, while unloading and positioning four bales in the storage area took about two minutes. Field efficiency depended primarily on the transport distance and the speed at which the towing tractor could safely operate during transport. For example, in one field of alfalfa and bromegrass it took from 20 to 25 minutes to load, unload and transport four bales and return to the field. This included 0.4 km (0.25 mile) of field transport and 0.8 km (0.5 mile) of road transport.

No safety hazards were apparent when the mover was operated according to normal recommended procedures.

Summary of Farmhand Model F126-B Five-Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.19 MB)

The functional performance of the Farmhand Model F 126-B Five-Bale mover was good for loading and hauling large round bales from the field as well as for unloading at the storage area.

The Farmhand F126-B handled firm bales effectively. Five large round bales could be loaded onto the bed without difficulty but if the average bale weight exceeded 680 kg ( 1500 lb) the manufacturer's maximum load rating for the wagon could be exceeded. Operator experience was needed before bales could be loaded or unloaded smoothly and in an orderly manner.

The Farmhand F126-B towed very well, when fully loaded, at speeds up to 29 km/h (18 mph). In transport position the mover trailed directly behind the tractor permitting safe road travel and easy maneuvering in confined areas.

The overall durability was good but was reduced by difficulty of unlocking the swing hitch safety pin.

In average field conditions it took an experienced operator about five minutes to load five bales while unloading and positioning five bales in the storage area took about three minutes. Field efficiency depended largely on hauling distance and the speed at which the tractor could safely travel during transport. For example, in one field of alfalfa and bromegrass it took from 16 to 21 minutes to load, transport and unload five bales and return to the field. This included 0.4 km (0.25 mile) of field transport and 0.8 km (0.5 mile) of road transport. The walking beam undercarriage permitted smooth towing on rough fields.

No safety hazards were apparent when the mover was operated according to normal recommended procedures.

Summary of New Holland Model 85 Bale Handler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.20 MB)

The functional performance of the New Holland Model 85 Bale Handler was very good for loading and hauling large round bales from the field as well as for unloading at the storage area.

The New Holland 85 handled firm bales effectively. Four large round bales could easily be loaded with little overhang on the bed rails, but if average bale weight exceeded 680 kg (1500 lb), the manufacturer's maximum load rating for the wagon could be exceeded. Operator experience was needed before bales could be loaded or unloaded in a continuous, uniform, and orderly manner.

The New Holland 85 towed very well, when fully loaded, at speeds up to 29 km/h (18 mph). The swing tongue enabled safe road transport and easy maneuvering in confined areas.

The overall durability was very good, but was reduced by bending of the PTO drive line shield by contact with bales.

In average field conditions it took an experienced operator about five minutes to load four bales, while positioning and unloading four bales in the yard took just over two minutes. Field efficiency depended largely on the hauling distance and the speed at which the tractor could safely travel during transport. For example, in one field of alfalfa and bromegrass it took from 22 to 27 minutes to load, transport, and unload four bales and return to the field. This included 0.4 km (0.25 mile) of field travel and 0.8 km (0.5 mile) of road transport.

No safety hazards were apparent when the mover was operated according to normal recommended procedures.

Summary of B & K Bale Karrier 815 (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.25 MB)

The functional performance of the B & K Bale Karrier 815 was good for loading and hauling large round bales from the field but was fair for placement of bales due to lack of control and poor visibility.

The B & K 815 handled firm bales effectively. The total capacity of the twin bed wagon was eight large round bales with three bales on each bed and one bale held in each pickup fork. If average bale weight exceeded 680 kg (1500 lb) the manufacturer's maximum load rating for the wagon could be exceeded. Operator experience was needed before bales could be loaded or unloaded in a continuous, uniform and orderly manner.

The B & K 815 towed very well when fully loaded at speeds up to 29 km/h (18 mph). The width and height of the load restricted rear visibility in transport and unloading while the double bed width limited operation on narrow roadways and in confined areas.

Overall durability was fair due to the repeated failures of fork cylinder shafts, the bed drive chain and bed chains. An experienced operator could reduce these problems by exercising caution in machine operation.

In average field conditions it took an experienced operator nine minutes to load eight bales, while unloading and placing eight bales in the storage area took about two and one-half minutes. Field efficiency depended largely on hauling distance and the speed at which the tractor could safely travel during transport. For example, in one field of alfalfa and bromegrass it took from 22 to 33 minutes to load, transport and unload eight bales and return to the field. This included 0.4 km (0.25 mile) of field transport and 0.8 km (0.5 mile) of road transport. The spring suspension on the undercarriage permitted smooth towing on rough fields.

Caution should be exercised in unloading due to poor rear visibility.

Summary of McKee Bale-Rustler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.19 MB)

The functional performance of the McKee Bale-rustler was good for loading and hauling large round bales from the field as well as for unloading at the storage area.

The McKee Bale-rustler moved firm bales effectively. Five large round bales could be loaded providing the bales were placed tightly together and there was little overhang. If the bales were fluffy or ragged it was difficult to load the last bale without losing a bale off the rear of the conveyor. The wagon load rating of 3625 kg (8000 lb) could be exceeded if average bale weight was more than 725 kg (1600 lb). If the first bale loaded was heavier than 680 kg (1500 lb), the wagon became unstable with the right wheel rising from the ground during loading. Successive bales did not tip the wagon as the weight of the first bale on the bed prevented unbalance. Operator experience was needed before bales could be loaded or unloaded in a continuous, uniform and orderly manner.

The Bale-rustler towed very well, when fully loaded, at speeds up to 29 km/h (18 mph). The wagon trailed directly behind the tractor for safe road transport and easy maneuvering in confined areas.

Overall durability was very good but was reduced by failure of the cradle cylinder frame bracket.

In average field conditions it took an experienced operator four minutes to load five bales, while unloading and placing five bales in the storage area took about two and one-half minutes. Field efficiency depended largely on hauling distance and the speed at which the tractor could safely travel during transport. For example, in one field of alfalfa and bromegrass it took from 20 to 25 minutes to load, transport and unload five bales and return to the field. This included 0.4 km (0.25 mile) of field transport and 0.8 km (0.5 mile) of road transport.

No safety hazards were apparent when the mover was operated according to normal recommended procedures.

Summary of Kirchner Model 70 Automatic Bale Wagon (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.38 MB)

Overall functional performance of the Kirchner 70 was good. Ease of operation was fair while stack quality with dense, wellformed bales was good.

Considerable operator experience was needed to produce neat, durable stacks. A level stack site, with an adequate backstop, was required to prevent stack collapse. The most durable stacks were formed by placing two or more rows of bale loads beside each other. Bale uniformity was very important in obtaining a durable, weather resistant stack.

Suitable bale picking speeds varied from 5 to 10 km/h (3 to 6 mph). In average field conditions it took an experienced operator about 26 minutes to properly load 70 bales while unloading took about 6 minutes. Field efficiency depended mainly on operator dexterity and the speed at which the tractor could safely be handled. Hay loss during field operation was negligible.

The Kirchner 70 loaded firm, well-formed bales effectively. Sometimes, in rough fields, tiers were prematurely pushed onto the load deck. Manual correction was inconvenient and difficult. To obtain stack stability, the Kirchner 70 used a semi-automatic twine tie system. Tiers of bales were hand tied together with twine. Two sets of ties were needed on each bale load for stable stacks. Hand tying required about 7 minutes of operator time for each bale load. Unloading was easy once the load was aligned and positioned. During the push-off, the load deck fingers sometimes pulled the outer lower bales away from the stack.

Control rods were easily adjusted and could be positioned to suit most tractors. All lubrication and adjustments were easily accomplished with the load deck and table lowered. Hitching was inconvenient due to the large hitch weight. The support leg usually settled, requiring a jack.

To fully utilize the capacity of the wagon and to ensure safe road transport, at least a 45 kW (60 hp) tractor should be used.

The Kirchner 70 towed well, fully loaded, at speeds up to 30 km/h (19 mph). However, this was unsafe, as the tire loads exceeded the Tire and Rim Association maximum rating by 28%. Caution had to be used when transporting due to restricted rear visibility.

The Kirchner 70 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed. Care had to be exercised when starting or completing ties.

Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. The table chain broke several times. The loader wheel bearing failed and front loader pivot bolt broke when operating in rough fields. The loader bale guides bent and the hitch clevis cracked.

Summary of Sperry New Holland 1033 Automatic Bale Wagon (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.29 MB)

Overall functional performance of the New Holland 1033 was very good. Ease of operation was very good while stack quality with dense, well formed bales was good.

Considerable operator experience was needed to produce neat, durable stacks. A level site, with an adequate backstop, was required to prevent stack collapse. The most durable stacks were formed by placing two, or more, rows of bale loads beside each other. Bale uniformity was very important in obtaining a durable, weather resistant stack.

Suitable bale picking speeds varied from 6 to 13 km/h (4 to 8 mph). In average field conditions, it took an experienced operator about 18 minutes to properly load 103 bales while unloading took about 5 minutes. Field efficiency depended mainly on operator dexterity and the speed at which the tractor could safely be handled. Hay loss during field operation was negligible.

The New Holland 1033 loaded firm dense bales effectively. The loader cross conveyor chain sometimes shredded the bottom of fine wheat straw bales. To obtain stack stability, the New Holland 1033 used an automatic system which rearranged the bales on the second table to form a tie. Tie tier formation was quick and easy and could be completed without interrupting the loading process. Two tie tiers were needed on each bale load to form stable stacks. Unloading was easy once the load was aligned and positioned. Rear visibility was limited, however, a skilled operator could easily align and position the wagon.

Control rods were easily adjusted and could be positioned to suit most tractors. All lubrication and adjustments could be completed with the load deck and tables lowered. Hitching was easy and convenient.

To fully utilize the capacity of the wagon and to ensure safe road transport, at least a 50 kW (67 hp) tractor should be used.

The New Holland 1033 towed very well, fully loaded, at speeds up to 30 km/h (19 mph). However, this was unsafe, as the tire loads exceeded the Tire and Rim Association maximum rating by 58%. Caution had to be used when transporting due to restricted rear visibility.

The New Holland 1033 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. The first table twisted, the rolling rack was bent and a support brace on the rear sideboard cross member broke.

Summary of Sperry New Holland 8500 Round Bale Wagon (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.22 MB)

Overall Performance: Overall performance of the New Holland Model 8500 round bale wagon was very good. Ease of loading was very good while load placement with well formed bales was good.

Bale Retrieval: The New Holland 8500 loaded firm, well formed bales effectively. When loading soft core bales, interference between the bale edge and the right operator's cab window caused damage to the window. When loading eight, 72 in (1830 mm) diameter bales, the rear tailgate was forced partially open.

Load Placement: Operator experience was needed to produce neat uniform rows at the stack area. Unloading was easy once the wagon was aligned at the stack area. Rear visibility was limited, however a skilled operator could easily align and position the wagon. The most weather resistant bale spacing was one in which adjacent loads were placed tightly together and successive loads slightly spaced.

Ease of Operation: Most controls were conveniently located. The gear shift lever and foot throttle were inconveniently located resulting in operator fatigue. Most lubrication and adjustments were easily accomplished with the load deck lowered.

The New Holland transported well, fully loaded, at speeds up to 30 mph (48 km/h). Caution had to be exercised when transporting due to restricted rear visibility.

Rate of Work: Bales could be loaded at speeds up to 4.0 mph (6.5 km/h). In average field conditions, it took an experienced operator about three and one-half minutes to load eight bales while unloading usually took less than two minutes. Field efficiency depended mainly on operator experience and field surface condition. Material losses during transport were negligible.

Operator Safety: The New Holland 8500 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed. The operator's manual was clearly written and contained much useful information.

Mechanical Problems: Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. The load rack extensions bent when attempting to unload on uneven ground. Several load rack extension J-pins bent and the right operator's cab window was damaged on four occasions.

Summary of Massey Ferguson 505 Round Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.22 MB)

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: The Massey 505 bale mover was easy to operate. Operators required about 2 hours of operational time to become familiar with the controls and necessary procedures in order to load/unload bales in an orderly manner.

Bale forks had to be adjusted to be compatible with different sizes of bales. Two set screws on each bale fork were loosened and the bale forks were moved along the lift arms to accommodate varying bale sizes.

Conveyor chain tensions were individually adjustable from the rear of the bale mover.

Capacity: The Massey Ferguson 505 round bale mover has a load capacity of 17,000 lbs (7711 kg). The 30 ft (9.15 m) deck allowed space for 12 bales 5 ft (1.5 m) long or 10 bales 6 ft (1.8 m) long.

Quality of Work: The Massey 505 round bale mover's performance rated very good in all conditions. The Massey was effective in retrieving and moving round bales of all sizes. Operator experience was needed before bales could be loaded or unloaded in a continuous, uniform and orderly manner.

Crop losses and bale damage were very slight if well formed bales were handled. Some twine damage occurred when older ovate bales were loaded/unloaded.

Rate of Work: In average field conditions, it took an experienced operator about 13 minutes to load 10 bales. The Massey 505 towed very well at speeds of 18 mph (29 km/h) when fully loaded. Unloading took about 3 minutes.

Power Requirements: Tractors of at least 75 hp (56 kW) were required to safely operate the Massey in most field conditions.

Operator Safety: The Massey 505 was safe to operate as long as usual safety precautions were followed and a tractor of sufficient size and weight was used.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was well organized and contained useful information on assembly, warranty, operation, servicing and parts.

Mechanical History: The implement jack was damaged from tractor wheel contact. The hitch truss failed due to fatigue at the end of the test.

Summary of Forster Model 40 Round Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.27 MB)

Quality of Work: The Forster Model 40 picked up, transported and placed round bales with a minimum of damage. Bales that had been sitting in one place and allowed to ovate were sometimes difficult to retrieve without snagging the twine.

Hitching: Hook-up was easily accomplished by one person in about 5 minutes. The self clutching ball type hitch provided a reliable and safe hook-up.

Bale Retrieval: The Forster Model 40 effectively retrieved bales of various sizes and conditions. Bales that had been in storage and allowed to ovate were sometimes difficult to pickup without snagging the twine.

Transporting: The Forster Model 40 trailed very well, and was stable at highway speeds of 50 mph (80 km/h). Hay toss during transport was insignificant. Maneuvering was very good and typical of most trailers with this type of gooseneck hitch.

Placement: Placement of the bales at the intended storage area was very good and easy to accomplish. Bales were butted tightly together in windrows, and could be unloaded either from the front or the rear of the bale mover.

Power Requirements: The Forster Model 40 was designed to be drawn by either a tractor or light truck. The model tested was set up to be truck drawn. The truck used was a 1982 Ford F 250 4x4 and had sufficient power and traction to effectively operate the bale mover. An optional hydraulic power source was added to the truck and provided ample pressure and flow to operate the various cylinders on the bale mover.

A tractor of 60 hp (45 kW) with a single remote hydraulic circuit would have sufficient power and weight to operate the Forster Model 40.

Operator Safety: The Forster Model 40 was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were followed.

Operator's Manual: No operator's manual was supplied.

Mechanical History: A pin which holds the hydraulic cylinder to the left wheel felt out and was replaced. Additionally. one of the used military tires blew out and was replaced.

Summary of Morris M-881 Hay Hiker Round Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.24 MB)

Ease of Operation: The Morris M-881 Hay Hiker was easy to operate. Operators required some practice before bales could be loaded/unloaded in an efficient and orderly manner. The single bale fork had to be adjusted for width to be compatible with the size of bales being loaded. Push bar chains were individually adjustable and required periodic adjustment.

Capacity: The Morris M-881 had a load capacity of 12,000 lbs (5440 kg). The 24 ft (7.2 m) beds allowed space for eight 1500 lb (680 kg) round bales.

Quality of Work: The Morris Hay Hiker's performance rated very good in all conditions. The Morris was effective in retrieving and moving round bales of most sizes. Operator experience was needed before bales could be loaded or unloaded in a continuous, uniform and orderly manner.

Crop losses and bale damage were negligible if well formed bales were handled. Some twine damage occurred when older ovate bales were loaded.

Rate of Work: In average field conditions, it took an experienced operator about 7.5 minutes to load 8 bales. Unloading took about 2 minutes including time taken to back to the stack. The Morris towed very well at speeds of 18 mph (29 km/h) when fully loaded.

Power Requirements: Tractors of at least 65 hp (49 kW) with dual hydraulic outlets were required to safely operate the Morris in most field conditions.

Operator Safety: The Morris Hay Hiker was safe to operate if usual safety precautions were followed and a tractor of sufficient size and weight was used.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was well written, well organized and illustrated. The manual contained useful information on assembly, warranty, operation, servicing, safety and parts.

Mechanical History: The optional bale divider tube broke at 60 hours. The tube was welded and remained intact for the remainder of the test.

Summary of Laurier H4250 Round Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.19 MB)

Ease of Operation: The Laurier H-4250 was very easy to operate. Operators required about 2-3 hours of operational time to become familiar with the controls and necessary procedures in order to load/unload bales in an orderly manner. Bale forks had to be adjusted to be compatible with different sizes of bales. Two set screws on each bale fork were loosened and the bale fork moved along the lift arm until the desired position was reached. Conveyor chain tensions were individually adjustable from the rear of the bale mover.

Capacity: The Laurier H-4250 bale mover has a load capacity of 18,000 lbs (8165 kg). The two 33 ft (10.1 m) bale beds allowed room for six, 6 ft (1.8 m) bales or seven 5 ft (1.5 m) bales on each bed.

Quality of Work: The Laurier H-4250 bale mover's performance was rated very good in all conditions. The Laurier was effective in retrieving and moving round bales of all sizes. Operator experience was needed before bales could be loaded or unloaded in a continuous, uniform and orderly manner.

Crop losses and bale damage were very slight if well formed bales were handled. Some twine damage occurred when older ovate bales were handled. Additionally, when bales were loaded from the rear, by raising the deck and backing into the bales, heavy twine damage resulted.

Rate of Work: Rate of work was dependent on operator experience and the distance the bales were from each other. On the average, it took about 15 minutes to load twelve well formed bales. The Laurier towed very well at speeds up to 20 mph (32 km/h). Unloading took about 2.5-3 minutes.

Power Requirements: At a speed of 6.1 mph (9.7 km/h), the fully loaded Laurier required 14.3 hp (10.7 kW) to kept it rolling on a firm alfalfa field. A tractor of at least 100 hp (75 kW) was required on soft, uneven summerfallow. The tractor also required one remote hydraulic circuit and an electrical system.

Operator Safety: The Laurier H-4250 was safe to operate as long as usual safety precautions were followed and a tractor of sufficient size and weight was used.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was well organized and contained useful information on assembly, warranty, operation, servicing and parts.

Mechanical History: Hitch mounting lugs failed at about 300 hours. A conveyor chain link failed at 310 hours.

Summary of Mumby Round Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.17 MB)

Rate of Work: The rate of work was highly dependent on the skill level of the front-end loader operator and the distance travelled to the unloading site. In general, it took about 10 minutes to fully load the Mumby and 30 seconds to unload.

The Mumby's bale beds allowed space for 8 bales 6 ft (1.8 m) long or 10 bales 5 ft (1.5 m) long and had a total rated capacity of 11,400 lbs (5171 kg).

Quality of Work: The Mumby Round Bale Mover's performance rated good in most conditions. The Mumby was effective in moving and unloading round bales of most types and sizes. The Mumby unloaded bales in windrows of 4 or 5 bales per side, however, there was a space of 24 ft (7.3 m) between rows. Crop losses and bale damage were negligible as there was no aggressive action taken on the bales.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: PAMI rating for hitching, loading, transporting and lubricating the Mumby was good. The Mumby required a front-end loader to place eight or ten round bales on the bed rails. Unloading was quick and easy and was accomplished by pulling a lever and operating a hand winch. However, occasional load imbalance would create a dangerous situation for the operator. PAMI rated unloading as fair.

Power Requirements: The Mumby could be towed with either a truck or tractor. It required a 115 hp (85.8 kW) tractor for adequate towing.

Operator Safety: Some safety concerns became apparent after using the Mumby the first few times. When the winch crank was turned to unload the wagon, one side of bales would roll off before the other and cause an imbalance in the load which would result in the wagon tipping to the loaded side. PAMI's rating was fair.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual consisted of brief operating instructions, maintenance, hub assembly illustrations with parts list for the hub. PAMI's rating was poor.

Mechanical History: The winch cable that raised the tilting beds failed after 4 hours of operation.

Summary of Knudson Square Bale Stacker and Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.21 MB)

Rate of Work: The rate of work was hampered by the performance of the accumulator, and the inability of the stacker pickup to release the bales at the desired time. A full load of 310 bales could be picked up and placed on the stacker's deck in about 1.25 hours. Unloading took about five minutes.

The Knudson stacker allowed room for 310 bales, 34 in (864 mm) in length or 285 bales, 40 in (1016 mm) in length. At an average bale weight of 70 lb (32 kg), the wagon would carry 10.8 tons (9.8 t) in a single load. The tires supplied with the Knudson were poorly selected and did not provide adequate carrying capacity for normal working loads.

Quality of Work: The Knudson stacker was gentle to the crop, and did not impart aggressive action to the bales. The exposed surface area/ton of crop was high in comparison to other means of square bale stacking. The quality of work was rated as good.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: The accumulator would accumulate six bales, and drop them in a row, but would often carry the seventh bale some 10 to 15 ft (3 or 4.5 m) further before dropping it to the ground, making loading difficult. Operators required considerable practice picking up bales and loading them onto the deck. Unloading was easy and took about five minutes. PAMI rated accumulating, hitching, loading and lubricating as fair. Adjustments were rated as good.

Transporting and unloading were rated as very good.

Power Requirements: The Knudson stacker required a tractor with two remote hydraulic outlets capable of 1,500 psi (10.3 MPa) and 540 rpm PTO shaft. PAMI effectively operated a fully loaded stacker with a 110 hp (82 kW) Deutz-Allis 7110 tractor.

Operator Safety: The Knudson square bale stacker was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were followed. The Knudson was not equipped with an implement jack and required the hitch to be lifted with a hydraulic jack or other similar device when hitching. Care had to be exercised when hitching. The Knudson did not display a slow moving vehicle sign, nor were there decals in place that would warn operators or bystanders of potential danger zones. Operator safety was rated as fair.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was poor and did not contain much useful information.

Mechanical History: The Knudson stacker evaluated by PAMI had been previously stored for an indefinite period outdoors. All of the hinge points on the pickup frame were rusted and were troublesome when loading. A pin that connects the two portions of one unloading arm failed and had to be replaced. The flared opening of the pickup bent and had to be repaired. In addition, the tires supplied with the machine were old and worn out, as well as being of different types. Two flat rim occurred during the short test.

Mechanical History: A few mechanical problems were noted during the test period. The stabilizing outrigger wheel separated from its mounting, and the deck tilt cylinder mounting lug tore loose.

Summary of Laurier H2125 Round Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.20 MB)

Rate of Work: The Laurier 2125 could be loaded with six round bales in about seven minutes, if the bales were situated in close proximity to each other in the field. Loading performance was limited by time required to operate the hydraulic functions, distance the bales were apart, field roughness, operator experience and dexterity. Backing to the previous load and unloading took about four minutes.

The Laurier 2125 allowed room for six bales 6 ft (1.8 m) in length, and seven bales 5 ft (1.5 m) in length. Assuming an average bate weight of 1500 lbs (680 kg) the wagon would carry 4.5 tons (4.0 t) in a single load.

Quality of Work: The quality of work was good. The Laurier 2125 was gentle with the bales and did not break twine during loading. Sometimes twine was damaged when hauling long distances over rough ground. The sharp edges of the conveyor chain would sometimes cut the twine. Bales were picked from the field and unloaded in a different orientation from which they were in the field.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of operation and adjustment was very good. The machine effectively retrieved round bales as they sat in the field with very little operator experience. Unloading was easy.

Adjusting the Laurier consisted of tensioning the bale bed conveyor chains and adjusting the width of the bale forks. Each adjustment was simple and straightforward.

Power Requirements: The Laurier 2125 required a towing vehicle with dual remote hydraulic outlets capable of supplying 1500 psi (10.3 MPa) and a 12 volt electrical supply. The bale mover was designed to be operated with a tractor or truck. The Laurier 2125 was effectively operated with a 72 hp (54 kW) tractor.

Operator Safety: Operator safety was very good. The Laurier 2125 was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were followed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was good. It was well written and illustrated and contained useful information on parts, assembly, operation, maintenance, safety and warranty.

Summary of Kingsman RBM - 217 Round Bale Mover (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.19 MB)

Rate of Work: The Kingsman 217 could be loaded with twelve bales 6 ft (1.8 m) in length or fourteen bales 5 ft (1.5 m) in length. If the bales were situated in close proximity to each other in the field, twelve bales could be loaded in about eleven minutes. Fourteen bales could be loaded in about 13 minutes. Loading performance was limited by the time required to operate the hydraulic functions, distance the bales were apart, field roughness, operator experience and dexterity. Backing to the previous load and unloading took about five minutes.

Quality of Work: The quality of work was very good. The Kingsman 217 was gentle with the bales and did not break twine during loading. The quarter turn lift arm allowed bales to be picked from the field in the same orientation from which they come from the baler.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of hitching was very good. It involved adjusting the hitch to the proper height and connecting four hydraulic hoses and a 12 volt power supply.

Ease of loading was very good. After a bit of practice both the standard lift arm and the quarter turn lift arm were easily operated. Ease of unloading was also very good. The operation was fast and simple. Ease of reloading was good. Bales were easily reloaded by backing under them and reversing the chains, but usually some twines were broken.

Ease of transporting was very good. The bale mover towed easily, but care had to be exercised on public roads due to restricted visibility to the rear.

Ease of adjustment was very good. Most adjustments were easily understood and completed.

Ease of lubrication was very good. Grease fittings were easy to get at and daily service took about ten minutes.

Power Requirements: The Kingsman 217 round bale mover was designed to be operated with an agricultural tractor and was effectively operated with a tractor of about 110 hp (83 kW). The Kingsman required a towing vehicle, equipped with dual remote hydraulic outlets, capable of supplying 1500 psi (10.3 MPa) and a 12 volt electrical supply.

Operator Safety: Operator safety was very good. The Kingsman 217 was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were followed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was fair. The manual lacked detailed information on specifications, operation and safety.

Mechanical History: A few mechanical problems were noted during the test period. A flow control valve failed twice and a conveying chain bearing failed.

 
 
 
 
For more information about the content of this document, contact Darryl Slingerland.
This document is maintained by Marlene Friesen.
This information published to the web on February 14, 2002.
Last Reviewed/Revised on October 30, 2012.