Balers and Baler Attachments

 
 
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16 Hesston 5800 Rounder
17 John Deere Model 500 Round Baler
18 New Holland Model 850 Round Baler
19 McKee Model 1500 Round Baler
97 Hesston 5400 Rounder
98 John Deere Model 510 Round Baler
99 Verrneer 605E Round Baler
100 Lundell 760C Round Baler
134 Massey Ferguson Model 128 Baler
135 John Deere Model 346 Baler
136 New Holland Model 320 Baler
144 International Harvester 241 Bigroll Baler
145 Massey Ferguson MF560 Baler
146 Hesston 5500 Rounder
234 International Harvester Model 425 Baler
235 Massey Ferguson Model 124 Baler
236 New Holland Model 310 Baler
278 Hesston Model 4600 Beeline Baler
279 International Harvester Model 445 Baler
299 AVCO New Idea Model 486 Round Baler
300 Krone KR180 Round Baler
488 New Holland 849 Round Baler
489 Claas Rollant 62 Round Baler
523 Gehl RB 1860 Round Baler
530 Vicon RP 1510 Round Baler
554 New Idea 486 Round Baler
555 New Holland 855 Round Baler
557 Gehl RB 1710 Round Baler
586 Gehl RB 1865 Round Baler
601 Rampak Silage Bagget
611 Deutz-Allis GP 2.50 Round Baler
626 Vermeer Bale Wrapper
627 Unverferth RA 220 Bale Wrapper
628 Vicon MP800 Baler
634 Hesston 560 Round Baler
636 Case International 8460 Round Baler
677 John Deere 535 Round Baler
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Summary of Hesston 5800 Rounder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.24 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the Hesston 5800 Rounder was good in most crops. Ease of operation was fair while ease of adjustment was good. Operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was fair.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 8.0 to 10 km/h (5 to 6.2 mph) while average throughputs varied from 4.7 to 12.3 t/h (5.2 to 13.5 ton/h). Ground speed was usually limited by pickup loss and not by baler capacity. Feeding was aggressive in all crops but was reduced somewhat in long, coarse-stemmed sweet clover due to sluggish compression roller feeding.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed and neat in appearance. The Hesston 5800 produced bales with an average length of 1.5 m (60 in) and an average diameter of 1.8 m (70 in). Hay bales weighed from 780 kg to 895 kg (1720 to 1975 lb) with an average density of 225 kg/m³ (14.3 lb/ft³).

Power Requirements: Peak power take-off requirements were about 19 kW (26 hp) in hay and 14 kW (19 hp) in straw.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy windrows, at optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was less than 5% while in light, dry alfalfa, average bale chamber loss was 16% and pickup loss was 11%. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The Hesston 5800 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's recommendations on operation and adjustment were closely followed.

Summary of John Deere 500 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.21 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the John Deere 500 round baler was very good but was reduced by feeding problems in long, coarse-stemmed crops. Ease of operation and adjustment both were good. Operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was good.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 7 to 10 km/h (4.3 to 6.2 mph) while average throughputs varied from 5.5 to 12.3 t/h (6.1 to 13.5 ton/h). Ground speed was usually limited by pickup loss and not by baler capacity. Feeding was aggressive in all crops but was severely reduced in long, coarse-stemmed sweet clover due to unsatisfactory compression roller feeding.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed and neat in appearance. The John Deere 500 produced bales with an average length of 1.6 m (63 in) and an average diameter of 1.7 m (68 in). Hay bales weighed from 770 to 880 kg (1700 to 1940 lb) with an average density of 220 kg/m³ (13.7 lb/ft³).

Power Requirements: Peak power take-off requirements were about 22 kW (29 hp) in hay and 20 kW (27 hp) in straw.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy windrows, at optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was less than 5% while in light, dry alfalfa, average bale chamber loss was 15% and pickup loss was 7%. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The John Deere 500 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Summary of New Holland 850 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.19 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the New Holland 850 round baler was good in most crops. Ease of operation and adjustment both were good. Operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was fair.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 7.5 to 10 km/h (4.6 to 6.2 mph) while average throughputs varied from 5.0 to 12.3 t/h (5.5 to 13.5 ton/h). Ground speed was usually limited by pickup loss and not by baler capacity. Feeding was aggressive in all crops except in very dry straw where back feeding occurred.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed but had a shaggy appearance. The New Holland 850 produced bales with an average length of 1.7 m (68 in) and an average diameter of 1.7 m (68 in). Hay bales weighed from 705 to 865 kg (1530 to 1905 lb) with an average density of 192 kg/m³ (12.0 lb/ft³).

Power Requirements: Peak power take-off requirements were about 14 kW (19 hp) in hay and 15 kW (20 hp) in straw.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy windrows, at optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was less than 5% while in light, dry alfalfa, average bale chamber loss was 17% and pickup loss was 10%. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture and content all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The New Holland 850 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Summary of McKee 1500 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.18 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the McKee 1500 round baler was very good in most crops. Ease of operation and adjustment both were very good. Operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was good.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 8 to 11 km/h (5.0 to 6.9 mph) while average throughputs varied from 6.9 to 12.3 t/h (7.6 to 13.5 ton/h). Ground speed was usually limited by pickup loss and not by baler capacity. Feeding was aggressive in all crops except in very heavy windrows where capacity was limited by occasional plugging at the pickup compression bars.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed and neat in appearance. The McKee 1500 produced bales with an average length of 1.5 m (59 in) and an average diameter of 2 m (78 in). Hay bales weighed from 760 to 840 kg (1680 to 1850 lb) with an average density of 173 kg/m³ (10.8 lb/ft³).

Power Requirements: Peak power take-off requirements were about 45 kW (60 hp) in hay and 40 kW (53 hp) in straw.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy windrows, at optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was less than 5% while in light, dry alfalfa, average bale chamber loss was 10% and pickup loss was 7%. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The McKee 1500 was safe to operate if normal safety procedures were closely followed. The absence of gate cylinder locks created a safety hazard while servicing.

Summary of Hesston 5400 Rounder (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.22 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the Hesston 5400 Rounder was fair in hay and poor in grain straw. Ease of operation was good while ease of adjustment was fair. Operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was fair.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 5.0 to 8.5 km/h (3.1 to 5.3 mph) while average throughputs varied from 0.8 to 3.1 t/h (0.9 to 3.4 ton/h). Maximum instantaneous feedrates of up to 16 t/h (17.6 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. In most crops, ground speed and feedrate were limited by pickup loss.

Bale Quality: Hay bales were well formed and neat in appearance, but straw bales were poorly formed with an irregular surface. The Hesston 5400 produced hay bales with an average length of 1.6 m (63 in), an average diameter of 1.7 m (67 in) and weighing from 322 to 447 kg (710 to 985 lb). Average straw bales were 1.6 m (63 in) in length and 0.9 m (36 in) in diameter, weighing only 75 kg (164 lb). Average bale density was 104 kg/m³ (6.5 lb/ft³) for hay and 74 kg/m³ (4.6 lb/ft³) for straw.

Resistance of hay bales to moisture penetration was fair. Peak power take-off requirements were about 12 kW (16 hp) in hay and 6 kW (8 hp) in straw while draft varied from 2.5 to 10.5 kW (3.3 to 14 hp) during bale formation.

Pickup and bale chamber losses were comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy windrows at optimum moisture content, total loss was 7%, or less, while in light dry alfalfa, total loss of up to 30% was measured. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content, all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The Hesston 5400 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Summary of John Deere 510 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.20 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the John Deere 510 round baler was very good but was reduced by feeding problems in long coarse-stemmed crops. Ease of operation and adjustment both were good. Operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was good.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 7 to 17 km/h (4.3 to 10.6 mph) while average throughputs varied from 1.8 to 7.5 t/h (2.0 to 8.3 ton/h). Maximum instantaneous feedrates of up to 17 t/h (18.7 ton/h) were measured in heavy, uniform alfalfa windrows. Ground speed was usually limited by pickup loss and not by baler capacity. Feeding was aggressive in nearly all crops. In long coarse-stemmed crops, such as sweet clover, capacity was reduced by unsatisfactory feeding through the compression rollers.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed and neat in appearance. The John Deere 510 produced bales with an average length of 1.6 m (63 in) and an average diameter of 1.8 m (71 in). Hay bales weighed from 550 to 1050 kg (1213 to 2315 lb) with an average density of 215 kg/m³ (13.4 lb/ft³).

Resistance of bales to moisture penetration was good.

Power Requirements: Peak power take-off requirements were about 20 kW (27 hp) in hay and 18 kW (24 hp) in straw on flat terrain under normal conditions. More power was required in hills or soft ground.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy windrows at near optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was 2% while pickup loss was 5%. In light dry alfalfa, average bale chamber loss was 17% and pickup loss was 12%. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The John Deere 510 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Summary of Vermeer 605E Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.25 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the Vermeer 605E round baler was good. Ease of operation and adjustment both were good, while operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was fair.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 5 to 19 km/h (3.1 to 11.8 mph) while average throughputs varied from 1.7 to 7.5 t/h (1.9 to 8.3 ton/h). Maximum instantaneous feed rates of up to 14 t/h (15.4 ton/h) were measured in heavy, uniform alfalfa windrows. Ground speed was usually limited by pickup loss and not by baler capacity. Feeding was aggressive in all crops, but was reduced somewhat in long, coarse-stemmed material due to pickup plugging.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed and neat in appearance. The Vermeer 605E produced bales with an average length of 1.6 m (63 in) and an average diameter of 1.7 m (67 in). Hay bales weighed from 400 to 680 kg (880 to 1500 lb) with an average density of 151 kg/m³ (9.4 lb/ft³).

Resistance of hay bales to moisture penetration was good. Peak power take-off requirements were about 17 kW (23 hp) in hay and straw on flat firm fields. More power was required in hills or on soft ground.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy crops, at near optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was 1% and pickup loss was 8%. In light dry alfalfa, average bale chamber loss was 8% and pickup loss was 12%. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content, all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The Vermeer 605E was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Summary of Lundell 760C Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.25 MB )

Overall Performance: Without major improvements, the Lundell 760C round baler is not suitable for typical prairie haying conditions. Overall functional performance of the Lundell 760C was fair in long coarse hay, poor in average hay crops, and unsatisfactory in short hay and straw. Ease of operation and adjustment both were fair. Operation of the twine tie mechanism was fair.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 7 to 8 km/h (4.3 to 5.0 mph) while average throughputs varied from 1.5 to 3.0 t/h (1.7 to 3.3 ton/h). Maximum instantaneous feedrates of up to 16 t/h (17.6 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform crops in long hay. Ground speed was usually limited by the uniformity of the bale and by baler losses. Pickup flotation was poor resulting in unsatisfactory performance on rough or irregular field surfaces due to digging of the pickup drum in the ground and skidding of the drive wheels.

Bale Quality: Bales were poorly formed and had an irregular shape. The Lundell 760C produced bales with an average length of 1.6 m (63 in) and an average diameter of 1.8 m (71 in). Hay bales weighed from 350 to 630 kg (772 to 1389 lb) with an average density of 119 kg/m³ (7.4 lb/ft³). Acceptable bales usually could not be produced in grain straw and short hay.

Resistance of the hay bales to moisture penetration was poor.

Peak drawbar power requirements were about 14 kW (19 hp) in alfalfa and 12 kW (16 hp) in straw on flat terrain under normal conditions. More power was needed in hills or soft ground.

Losses usually were higher than with conventional round balers. In heavy, non-brittle crops, at near optimum moisture content losses were 12%, while in light dry alfalfa, average losses were as high as 39%. Losses were more dependent upon hay fragility and brittleness than upon hay moisture content or feedrate

Operator Safety: The Lundell 760C was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Mechanical Problems: A considerable number of mechanical problems occurred during the short test period. Six weld failures occurred on main structural members, the bale forming cable frayed requiring replacement twice, while both the original and replacement twine metering rollers were eccentric causing faulty twine metering.

Summary of Massey Ferguson 128 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.29 MB )

Overall Performance:Overall functional performance of the Massey Ferguson 128 baler was very good.
Capacity:
Average feedrates varied from 4 to 10 t/h (4.4 to 11 ton/h). Field speeds were usually limited to 10 km/h (6.2 mph) due to bouncing on rough ground and reduced pickup performance at higher speeds. Maximum instantaneous feedrates in excess of 20 t/h (22 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. Feeding was aggressive in all crops.

Bale Quality: The Massey Ferguson 128 was capable of producing firm, well-formed bales. Length of the 356 x 457 mm (14 x 18 in) bales could be adjusted from 560 to 1270 mm (22 to 50 in). Bale length variation, at the 1000 mm (39 in) length setting, was about 155 mm (6.1 in). For a certain length setting, longer bales were usually produced at higher feedrates. Average hay bales weighed from 28 to 32 kg (62 to 70 lb) while average straw bales weighed from 20 to 22 kg (44 to 48 lb). Bale density varied from 191 kg/m³ (11.9 lb/ft³) in heavy alfalfa to 113 kg/m³ (7.1 lb/ft³) in light straw.

The Massey Ferguson 128 was easy to operate and adjust. Knotter performance was excellent with very few field adjustments required.

Power Requirements: Average power requirements were usually less than 25 kW (34 hp) but a 40 kW (55 hp) tractor was needed to overcome power take-off power fluctuations and to provide sufficient power on hilly or soft fields.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was usually less than 4%, similar to that of other conventional square balers.

Operator Safety: The Massey Ferguson 128 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed and normal safety precautions were observed.

Mechanical Problems: Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. Interference between the hitch jack and rear tractor tire caused damage to the jack and mounting bracket. The outer pickup tension spring and eyebolt were lost and the pickup gauge spring broke. The bale chute chain and hook failed and inadequate fastening of the left side of the bale chute in transport position caused bale chute damage.

Summary of John Deere 346 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.23 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the John Deere 346 baler was very good.

Capacity: Average feedrates varied from 4 to 10 t/h (4.4 to 11 ton/h). Field speeds were usually limited to 10 km/h (6.2 mph) due to bouncing on rough ground and reduced pickup performance at higher speeds. Maximum instantaneous feedrates in excess of 20 t/h (22 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. Feeding was aggressive in all crops.

Bale Quality: The John Deere 346 was capable of producing firm, well-formed bales. Length of the 356 x 457 mm (14 x 18 in) bales could be adjusted from 305 to 1270 mm (12 to 50 in). Bale length variation, at the 1 000 mm (39 in) length setting, was about 160 mm (6.3 in). For a certain length setting, longer bales were usually produced at higher feedrates. Average hay bales weighed from 27 to 37 kg (59 to 81 lb), while average straw bales weighed from 21 to 24 kg (46 to 53 lb). Bale density varied from 220 kg/m³ (13.7 lb/ft³) in heavy alfalfa to 125 kg/m³ (7.8 Ib/ft³) in straw.

The John Deere 346 was easy to operate and adjust. Knotter performance was satisfactory as long as the knotters were properly adjusted. Normally, the billhooks had to be changed and the twine disc timing adjusted when changing from heavy sisal twines to synthetic twines.

Power Requirements: Average power requirements were usually less than 28 kW (38 hp) but a 45 kW (60 hp) tractor was needed to overcome power take-off power fluctuations and to provide sufficient power on hilly and soft fields.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was usually less than 4%, similar to that of other conventional square balers.

Operator Safety: The John Deere 346 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed and normal safety precautions were observed.

Mechanical Problems: Only minor mechanical problems occurred during the test: The slip clutch plates had to be cleaned to remove a grease deposit.

Two slip clutch ratchet pins broke.

Summary of New Holland 320 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.33 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the New Holland 320 baler was very good.

Capacity: Average feedrates varied from 4 to 14 t/h (4.4 to 15.4 ton/h). Field speeds were usually limited to 10 km/h (6.2 mph) due to bouncing on rough ground and reduced pickup performance at higher speeds. Maximum instantaneous feedrates in excess of 20 t/h (22 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. Feeding was aggressive in all crops.

Bale Quality: The New Holland 320 was capable of producing firm, wellformed bales. Length of the 356 x 457 mm (14 x 18 in) bales could be adjusted from 305 to 1320 mm (12 to 52 in). Bale length variation, at the 1000 mm (39 in) length setting was about 115 mm (4.5 in). For a certain length setting, longer bales were usually produced at higher feedrates. Average hay bales weighed from 26 to 35 kg (62 to 77 lb), while average straw bales weighed from 18 to 26 kg (40 to 57 lb). Bale density varied from 210 kg/m³ (13.1 lb/f³) in heavy alfalfa to 106 kg/m³ (6.6 lb/ft³) in light straw.

The New Holland 320 was easy to operate. Most adjustments were convenient. Adjusting the feed tines and changing the pickup speed were both inconvenient. Knotter performance was satisfactory with most twines if the knotters were adjusted to the manufacturer's specifications. With some brands of synthetic twines the twine fingers had to be advanced slightly from the manufacturer's recommended setting. The optional synthetic twine billhooks had to be used when using synthetic twines.

Power Requirements: Average power requirements were usually less than 30 kW (40 hp) but a 45 kW (60 hp) tractor was needed to overcome power take-off power fluctuations, and to provide sufficient power on hilly and soft fields.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was usually less than 4%, similar to that of other conventional square balers.

Operator Safety: The New Holland 320 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed and normal safety precautions were observed.

Mechanical Problems: Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. The feed tines broke when rebaling broken bales. The optional hydraulic bale density control ram and linkages failed. One bale chute chain broke, the chain support brackets failed and the welds on the bale chute frame cracked.

Summary of International Harvester 241 Bigroll Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.16 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the International Harvester 241 round baler was good. Ease of operation was fair while ease of adjustment was good. Operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was good.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 6 to 16 km/h (3.8 to 10.0 mph) while average throughputs varied from 1.7 to 7.5 t/h (1.9 to 8.3 ton/h). Maximum instantaneous feedrates up to 18 t/h (19.8 ton/h) were measured in heavy, uniform hay windrows. Ground speed was usually limited by pickup loss and not by baler capacity. Feeding was aggressive in most crops. In short wheat and barley straw, feeding was hesitant causing occasional plugging in front of the compression rollers.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed and neat. The International Harvester 241 produced bales with an average length of 1.5 m (59 in) and an average diameter of 1.9 m (75 in). Hay bales weighed from 590 to 731 kg (1300 to 1610 lb) with an average density of 140 kg/m³ (8.7 lb/ft³).

Resistance of bales to moisture penetration was good. Peak power take-off requirements were about 19 kW (25 hp) in hay and straw on flat firm fields. More power was needed on soft or hilly fields.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy conditioned windrows at optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was 2% while pickup loss was 1%. In light, dry unconditioned hay an average bale chamber loss as high as 15% and pickup loss of 16% can be expected. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The International Harvester 241 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Summary of Massey-Ferguson MF 560 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.16 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the Massey-Ferguson MF 560 round baler was good. Ease of operation and adjustment were good, while operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was poor.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 11.0 to 16.3 km/h (6.8 to 10.1 mph) while average throughputs varied from 2.1 to 5.9 t/h (2.3 to 6.5 ton/h). Maximum instantaneous feedrates up to 19 t/h (21.0 ton/h) were measured in heavy, uniform hay windrows. Ground speed was usually limited by pickup loss and not by baler capacity. Feeding was aggressive in most crops. Feedrates had to be reduced in long coarse-stemmed sweet clover to permit even feeding through the compression rollers.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed and neat. The MF 560 produced bales with an average length of 1.5 m (59 in) and an average diameter of 1.8 m (71 in). Hay bales weighed from 464 to 721 kg (1022 to 1589 lb) with an average density of 136 kg/m³ (8.5 lb/ft³). Resistance of bales to moisture penetration was good. Peak power take-off requirements were about 13 kW (17 hp) in hay and 18 kW (24 hp) in straw on flat firm fields. More power was needed on soft or hilly fields.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy conditioned windrows at optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was 2% while pickup loss was 1%. In light dry unconditioned hay an average bale chamber loss as high as 15% and pickup loss as high as 15% can be expected. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The Massey-Ferguson MF 560 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Summary of Hesston 5500 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.16 MB )

Overall Performance: Overall functional performance of the Hesston 5500 round baler was good. Ease of operation and adjustment were very good in hay crops and good in straw. Operation of the twine wrapping mechanism was fair.

Capacity: Average field speeds varied from 9.5 to 13.6 km/h (5.9 to 8.5 mph) while average throughputs varied from 1.7 to 6.5 t/h (1.9 to 7.2 ton/h). Maximum instantaneous feedrates up to 19 t/h (21 ton/h) were measured in heavy, uniform hay windrows. Capacity was usually limited by interference of the pickup compression bars with the bale carrier roller. Feeding was aggressive in most crops.

Bale Quality: Bales were well formed and neat. The Hesston 5500 produced bales with an average length of 1.5 m (59 in) and an average diameter of 1.6 m (63 in). Hay bales weighed from 372 to 472 kg (820 to 1040 lb) with an average density of 143 kg/m³ (8.9 lb/ft³).

Resistance of bales to moisture penetration was good. Peak power take-off requirements were about 20 kW (27 hp) in hay and 32 kW (43 hp) in straw on flat firm fields. More power was needed on soft or hilly fields.

Leaf Loss: Leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy conditioned windrows at optimum moisture content, bale chamber loss was 2% while pickup loss was 1%. In light dry unconditioned hay an average bale chamber loss as high as 15% and pickup loss as high as 15% can be expected. Heavy windrows, proper conditioning and baling at the maximum permissible moisture content all were important in reducing bale chamber loss.

Operator Safety: The Hesston 5500 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed.

Summary of International Harvester 425 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.35 MB )

Overall Performance:The performance of the International Harvester 425 baler was good.

Capacity: Average feedrates varied from 2 to 8 t/h (2.2 to 8.8 ton/h). Field speeds were usually limited to 10 km/h (6.2 mph) due to bouncing on rough ground and reduced pickup performance at higher speeds. Maximum instantaneous feedrates in excess of 16 t/h (17.6 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. Feeding was aggressive in most crops.

Bale Quality:The International Harvester 425 was capable of producing firm, durable bales in most crops if additional bale wedges were installed in the bale chamber. In dry conditions or very light windrows, bale chamber density adjustment was inadequate to produce firm, dense durable bales. Length of the 356 x 457 mm (14 x 18 in) bales could be adjusted from 735 to 1320 mm (29 to 52 in). Bale length variation at the 1000 mm (39 in) setting, was about 120 mm (4.7 in). For a certain length setting, longer bales were usually produced at higher feedrates. Average hay bales weighed from 22 to 34 kg (48 to 75 lbs), while average straw bales weighed from 18 to 23 kg (40 to 51 lb). Bale density varied from 142 to 200 kg/m³ (8.6 to 12 lb/ft³) in hay and from 103 to 141 kg/m³ (6.2 to 8.5 lb/ft³) in straw.

Ease of Operation: The International Harvester 425 was easy to operate and adjust. Knotter performance was very good with both sisal and synthetic twines.

Power Requirements: Average power requirements were usually less than 19 kW (25 hp) but a 40 kW (54 hp) tractor was needed to overcome power take-off fluctuations and to provide sufficient power on hilly and soft fields.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf and stem loss was usually less than 3%, similar to that of other conventional square balers.
Operator Safety:
The International 425 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed and normal safety precautions were observed.

Mechanical Problems:Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. A set screw on the power take-off shaft was lost twice. The packer finger bearings failed. The packer finger guide rod retaining pin sheared, resulting in the packer fingers, guide rod, packer finger deflector plate and adjacent shielding being bent. In addition, two teeth on the packer finger crown gear chipped, and two pinion gear bearing mounting bolts sheared.

Summary of Massey Ferguson 124 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.29 MB )

Overall Performance:The performance of the Massey Ferguson 124 baler was very good.

Capacity: Average feedrates varied from 3 to 8 t/h (3.3 to 8.8 ton/h). Field speeds were usually limited to 10 km/h (6.2 mph) due to bouncing on rough ground and reduced pickup performance at higher speeds. Maximum instantaneous feedrates in excess of 15 t/h (16.5 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. Feeding was aggressive in all crops.

Bale Quality: The Massey Ferguson 124 was capable of producing firm, well formed bales. Length of the 356 x 457 mm (14 x 18 in) bales could be adjusted from 558 to 1270 mm (22 to 50 in). Bale length variation, at the 1000 mm (39.4 in) setting was about 100 mm (3.9 in). For a certain length setting, longer bales were usually produced at higher feedrates. Average hay bales weighed from 22 to 35 kg (48 to 77 lb) while average straw bales weighed from 20 to 25 kg (44 to 55 lb). Bale density varied from 142 to 235 km/m³ (8.5 to 14.1 lb/ft³) in hay and from 127 to 143 kg/m³ (7.6 to 8.7 lb/ft³) in straw.

Ease of Operation: The Massey Ferguson 124 was easy to operate and adjust. Knotter performance was good with most twines if the knotters were adjusted to the manufacturer's specifications. Little or no adjustment was required when changing from sisal to synthetic twine.

Power Requirements: Average power requirements were usually less than 21 kW (28 hp) but a 40 kW (54 hp) tractor was needed to overcome power take-off power fluctuations and to provide sufficient power in hilly and soft fields.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf and stem loss was usually less than 3%, similar to that of other conventional square balers.
Operator Safety:
The Massey Ferguson 124 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed and normal safety precautions were observed.

Mechanical Problems:Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. A weld failed on both the hitch and knotter frame. The metering arm slipped on the metering drive wheel. Three billhook gear roll pins broke and loose nuts and bolts were a frequent problem.

Summary of New Holland 310 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.28 MB )

Overall Performance:The performance of the New Holland 310 baler was very good.

Capacity: Average feedrates varied from 2 to 8 t/h (2.2 to 8.8 ton/h). Field speeds were usually limited to 10 km/h (6.2 mph) due to bouncing on rough ground and reduced pickup performance at higher speeds. Maximum instantaneous feedrates in excess of 15 t/h (16.5 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. Feeding was aggressive in all crops.

Bale Quality:The New Holland 310 was capable of producing firm, well formed bales. Length of the 356 x 457 mm (14 x 18 in) bales could be adjusted from 305 to 1320 mm (12 to 52 in). Bales length Variation at the 1000 mm (39 in) length setting was about 100 mm (3.9 in). For a certain length setting, longer bales were usually produced at higher feedrates. Average hay bales weighed from 27 to 35 kg (59 to 77 lb), while average straw bales weighed from 18 to 22 kg (40 to 48 lb). Average bale density varied from 174 to 205 kg/m³ (10.4 to 12.3 lb/ft³) in hay and from 123 to 115 kg/m³ (6.9 to 7.4 lb/ft³) in straw.

Ease of Operation: The New Holland 310 was easy to operate and adjust. Knotter performance was very good with most twines when properly adjusted. The synthetic twine billhooks required only minor adjustments for use with sisal twine

Power Requirements: Average power requirements were usually less than 19 kW (25 hp) but a 40 kW (54 hp) tractor was needed to overcome power take-off fluctuations and provide sufficient power on hilly or soft fields.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf and stem loss was usually less than 3%, similar to that of other conventional square balers.
Operator Safety:
The New Holland 310 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed and normal safety precautions were observed.

Mechanical Problems: Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. The drive shaft slip clutch was adjusted slightly beyond the manufacturer's specifications to prevent excessive slippage. A plunger face extension bent, a twine needle broke, a bale chute chain support bracket failed and the bale chute frame cracked.

Summary of Hesston 4600 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.31 MB )

Overall Performance:The performance of the Hesston 4600 Baler was very good.

Capacity: Average feed rates varied from 2 to 11 t/h (2.2 to 12.1 ton/h). Field speeds were usually limited to 10 km/h (6.2 mph) due to bouncing on rough ground and reduced pickup performance at higher speeds. Maximum instantaneous feedrates in excess of 22 t/h (24.2 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. Feeding was aggressive in all crops.

Bale Quality: The Hesston 4600 was capable of producing firm, well formed bales. Length of the 356 x 457 mm (14 x 18 in) bales could be adjusted from 305 to 1320 mm (12 to 52 in). Bale length variation, at the 1000 mm (39 in) setting, was about 100 mm (3.9 in). For a certain length setting, longer bales were usually produced at higher feedrates. Average hay bales weighed from 21 to 41 kg (45 to 90 lb), while average straw bales weighed from 21 to 24 kg (45 to 53 lb). Bale density varied from 254 kg/m³ (15.8 lb/ft³) in heavy alfalfa-bromegrass to 127 kg/m³ (7.9 lb/ft³) in light barley straw.

Ease of Operation: The Hesston 4600 was easy to operate and adjust. Knotter performance was good with both sisal and synthetic twines as long as the knotters were properly adjusted.

Power Requirements: Average power requirements were usually less than 23 kW (31 hp) but a 45 kW (60 hp) tractor was needed to overcome power take-off fluctuations and to provide sufficient power on hilly and soft fields.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf and stem loss was usually less than 3%, similar to that of other conventional square balers.
Operator Safety:
The Hesston 4600 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed and normal safety precautions were observed.

Mechanical Problems: Only minor mechanical problems occurred during the test. The slip clutch required adjustment beyond the manufacturer's recommended slip torque for efficient baling and the plunger safety stop required readjustment several times.

Summary of International Harvester Model 445 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.17 MB)

Overall Performance: The performance of the International Harvester 445 baler was good.

Capacity: Average feedrates varied from 2 to 11 t/h (2.2 to 12.1 ton/h). Field speeds were usually limited to 10 km/h (6.2 mph) due to bouncing on rough ground and reduced pickup performance at higher speeds. Maximum instantaneous feedrates in excess of 22 t/h (24.2 ton/h) were measured in heavy uniform alfalfa windrows. Feeding was aggressive in most crops.

Bale Quality:The International Harvester 445 was capable of producing firm, durable bales. Length of the 356 x 457 mm (14 x 18 in) bales could be adjusted from 305 to 1140 mm (12 to 45 in). Bale length variation, at the 1000 mm (39 in) setting, was about 120 mm (4.7 in). For a certain length setting, longer bales were usually produced at higher feedrates. Average hay bales weighed from 23 to 39 kg (50 to 85 lb), while average straw bales weighed from 20 to 27 kg (45 to 60 lb). Bale density varied from 234 kg/m³ (14.6 lb/ft³) in heavy alfalfa-bromegrass to 115 kg/m³ (7.7 lb/ft³) in light wheat straw.

Ease of Operation: The International Harvester 445 was easy to operate and adjust. Knotter performance was satisfactory with both sisal and synthetic twines and required few field adjustments. However, correct knot bow length was often difficult to obtain.

Power Requirements: Average power requirements were usually less than 16 kW (21 hp) but a 40 kW (54 hp) tractor was needed to overcome power take-off fluctuations and to provide sufficient power on hilly and soft fields.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf and stem loss was usually less than 4%, similar to that of other conventional square balers.

Operator Safety: The International Harvester 445 was safe to operate if the manufacturer's safety recommendations were closely followed and normal safety precautions were observed.

Mechanical Problems: Several mechanical problems occurred during the test. The power take-off shaft shielding broke due to binding. The bale chute chain support bracket bent and the billhook cams broke.

Summary of Avco New Idea Model 486 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.14 MB )

Overall Performance: The performance of the Avco New Idea Model 486 round baler was very good in hay and most straw crops. Similar to most round balers, it was difficult to bale short, chopped up straw, similar to that passed through a rotary combine.

Capacity: The average capacity of the Avco New Idea 486 varied from 3.3 ton/h (3.0 t/h) in bromegrass-timothy mixture to 11.2 ton/h (10.2 t/h) in alfalfa-bromegrass mixture. Maximum instantaneous feedrates up to 23.1 ton/h (21 t/h) were measured in heavy, uniform greenfeed windrows. Feed rate was usually limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Bale Quality: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and neat bales is most crops. Bale quality was reduced to fair in unconditioned greenfeed and short straw crops due to poor bale shape and bale durability. Hay bales weighed from 1255 to 1970 lb (570 to 895 kg) and straw bales from 818 to 1124 lb (372 to 511 kg).

Weatherability: Bale moisture penetration and spoilage was minimal after 170 days of weathering.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy windrows, baled under ideal moisture conditions, bale chamber loss was 1% while pickup loss was less than 1%. In dry windrows, bale chamber loss was 9%, and pickup loss was 2%.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 73 hp (55 kW) in hay and straw on level fields. However, a 100 hp (75 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft or hilly fields.

Ease of Operation: It was very easy to start and form a bale with the Avco New Idea 486. In greenfeed and tough hay a reduced ground speed was required when starting a bale.

The twine wrapping process was simple but required some experience. Twine wrapping was difficult in short straw due to backfeeding. In good conditions, a bale could be wrapped and discharged from the bale chamber in about one minute.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in most crops. In very dry, short straw, backfeeding into the pickup area occurred near bale completion, causing plugging and shear bolt failure.

The Avco New Idea 486 was easy to maneuver and transport. Visibility to the rear was restricted.

Ease of Adjustment: Adjusting the Avco New Idea 486 was simple. Platform and forming belts, chain drives and the pickup were easy to adjust. No platform or forming belts required repair or replacement.
Lubrication was easy.

Operator Safety: The New Idea 486 was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was clearly written and useful.

Mechanical Problems: No significant mechanical problems occurred during the test.

Summary of Krone KR180 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.17 MB )

Overall Performance: The.performance of the Krone KR180 round baler was good in hay and most straw crops. Performance was reduced in very dry hay and straw crop conditions. Similar to most round balers, it was difficult to bale short, chopped up straw, similar to that passed through a rotary combine.

Capacity: The average capacity of the Krone KR180 varied from 2.0 ton/h (1.8 t/h) in wheat straw to 8.5 ton/h (7.7 t/h) in hay. Maximum instantaneous feedrates up to 19 ton/h (17 t/h) were measured in heavy, uniform greenfeed windrows. Feedrate was usually limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Bale Quality: Bale quality varied from very good in ideal crop conditions to only fair in very dry and unconditioned crops. In these conditions, bale quality was reduced due to poor bale shape and inadequate bale durability. Hay bales weighed from 1235 to 2060 lb (560 to 936 kg) and straw bales from 755 to 1125 lb (343 to 511 kg).

Weatherability: Bale moisture penetration and spoilage was minimal after 170 days of weathering.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf loss was comparable to that of other large round balers. In heavy windrows baled under ideal moisture conditions, bale chamber loss was 2% while pickup loss was less that 1%. In light, dry windrows, bale chamber loss was 6% and pickup loss was 3%.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 47 hp (35 kW) in hay and straw on level fields. However, a 65 hp (48 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft or hilly fields.

Ease of Operation: It was very easy to start and form a bale with the Krone KR180. In greenfeed and tough hay a reduced ground speed was required when starting a bale. In light, dry crops, the bales often had to be wrapped and ejected before the bale was of adequate density. It was difficult to bale short straw due to backfeeding.

The twine wrapping mechanism was easy to operate and performed very well. A bale could be wrapped and discharged from the bale chamber in about one minute.

Feeding was positive in hay crops. Backfeeding occurred in straw and greenfeed. Removing the windguard improved feeding in these conditions.

The Krone KR180 was easy to maneuver and transport. Visibility to the rear was restricted.

Ease of Adjustment: Adjusting the Krone KR180 was simple. The forming chain, chain drives and the pickup were easy to adjust.

Lubrication was easy.

Operator Safety: The Krone KR180 was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was not clearly written, but did contain useful information on operation, servicing, adjustments and safety procedures.

Mechanical Problems: A few mechanical problems occurred during the test, requiring repairs to the pickup and baler frame.

Summary of New Holland 849 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.12 MB )

Overall Performance: The functional performance of the New Holland 849 round baler was very good in hay, high moisture green-feed (silage) and most straw crops. Baling short straw required slow power take-off speeds, and damp conditions to help form the core.

Capacity: The average throughput of the New Holland 849 varied from 3.5 ton/h (3.2 t/h) in alfalfa-bromegrass to 12.0 ton/h (10.9 t/h) in alfalfa. Throughput was usually limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Bale Quality: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in all crops except short straw. In this case, bale quality was fair to good due to poor bale durability. Hay bales weighed from 850 to 1000 lb (385 to 454 kg) and straw bales from 570 to 650 lb (260 to 295 kg).

Weatherability: Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good after 70 days of weathering.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf loss varied from 1.0 to 3.3% for 16% and 11% moisture contents respectively. This was very good.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 22 hp (16.4 kW) in hay and straw on level fields. A 65 hp (49 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly fields.

Ease of Operation: Starting and forming the bale was very easy with the New Holland 849. In short straw, reduced powertake off speed was required to start the bale.

The automatic twine wrapping device required the operator to stop, once the wrapping operation began. A bale ejector and reverse apron chain drive made backing unnecessary to clear the bale from under the gate. A bale could be wrapped and discharged in about 20 seconds.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in all crops. Overloading the pickup caused shearbolt failure or activation of the slip clutch.

The New Holland 849 was easy to maneuver and transport. Visibility to the rear was restricted.

Ease of Adjustment: Servicing, maintenance and routine adjustments were simple.

Operator Safety: The New Holland was safe to operate if personal precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was clearly written and useful.

Mechanical History: A slight bow in five of the apron bars was apparent during 191 hours of field test.


Summary of Claas Rollant 62 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.12 MB )

Overall Performance: The performance of the Claas Rollant 62 round baler was very good in hay, and most straw crops. Baling short straw required slow power take-off speeds, and dampness to help form a good durable bale.

Capacity: The average throughput of the Claas Rollant 62 varied from 2.8 ton/h (2.5 t/h) in rye straw to 10.0 ton/h (9.1 t/h) in alfalfa-bromegrass. Throughput was usually limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Bale Quality: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in all crops except short straw. In this case, bale quality was fair to good due to poor bale durability as a result of limiting bale density pressure. Hay bales weighed from 750 to 900 lb (341 to 409 kg) and straw bales from 500 to 590 lb (227 to 268 kg).

Weatherability: Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good after 70 days of weathering.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf loss varied from 5.0 to 8.0% for 16% and 11% moisture contents respectively. This was considered good.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 41 hp (31 kW) in hay and straw on level fields. A 75 hp (56 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly fields.

Ease of Operation: Starting and forming the bale was very easy with the Claas Rollant 62. In short straw, the bale density pressure had to be limited to about 170 bar (2460 psi) or the bale would stop rolling in the bale chamber.

The hydraulic twine wrapping device required operator experience to tie a good bale. The flow control valve did not adequately control the twine tube speed. The operator was required to stop, once the wrapping operation began. A bale ejector made backing unnecessary to clear the bate from under the gate. A bale could be wrapped and discharged in about 50 seconds.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in all crops, Overloading the bale chamber caused the hydraulic relief valve to release, while overloading the pickup caused activation of the slip clutch.

The Claas Rollant 62 was easy to maneuver and transport. Visibility to the rear was restricted.

Ease of Adjustment: Servicing, maintenance and routine adjustments were simple.

Operator Safety: The Claas Rollant was safe to operate if personal precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was clearly written and useful.

Mechanical History: No relevant serious mechanical problems were apparent during the 222 hours of field test.

Summary of Gehl RB 1860 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.17 MB )

Overall Performance: The functional performance of the Gehl RB 1860 round baler was very good in hay and straw crops. Correctly forming the core was the key in making a good bale.

Rate of Work: The average throughput of the Gehl RB 1860 varied from 5.4 ton/h (4.9 t/h) in oat and wheat straw to 11.5 ton/h (t0.4 t/h) in alfalfa. Throughput was usually limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Bale Quality: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in all crops. The bales were well formed and neat in appearance. Hay bales weighed from 1400 to 2100 lb (635 to 953 kg) and straw bales from 850 to 1250 lb (386 to 567 kg).

Weatherability: Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good after 65 days of weathering.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf and stem loss varied from 1.8% to 3.3% at a moisture content of 15%. This was very good.

Ease of Operation: Getting a solid core across the chamber was the only part of the baling operation that required experience. The bale starter made this operation easier. Forming the bale was very easy with the Gehl 1860.

The auto-electric wrap system required the operator to stop, once the wrapping operation began. Adjustable bale ramps made backing unnecessary to clear the bate from under the gate. A bale could be wrapped and discharged in about 50-70 seconds.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in all crops. Overloading the pickup caused shearbolt failure while overloading the bate chamber caused the overfill clutch to disengage the pickup.

The Geh11860 was easy to maneuver and transport. Visibility to the rear was good when the chamber was empty.

Ease of Adjustment: Servicing, maintenance and routine adjustments were simple.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 28 hp (21 kW) in hay and straw on level fields. A 50 to 60 hp (37 to 45 kW) tractor was suggested by the manufacturer to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly fields.

Operator Safety: The Gehl RB 1860 was safe to operate if standard precautions were observed. Care had to be taken when adjusting the pick-up height.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was clearly written and useful.

Mechanical Problems: Two upper belts came apart at the splice during the 180 hours of operation. Imminent failure of two other belts was apparent at the end of the test, An eyebolt supporting the rope for the bate size indicator failed. A weld in the rewrap roller failed. Hydraulic fittings on the gate cylinder were damaged and replaced.

Summary of Vicon RP 1510/CI 560 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.14 MB )

Overall Performance: The performance of the Vicon RP 1510/CI 560 round baler was very good in most hay and straw crops. Damp hay or straw restricted feeding capabilities and caused plugging.

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the Vicon RP 1510/CI 560 was 4.3 ton/h (3.9 t/h) in wheat straw and 8.4 ton/h (7.6 t/h) in alfalfa. Throughput was limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Bale Quality: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in all crops. Hay bales weighed from 1100 to 1400 lb (499 to 635 kg) and straw bales from 800 to 1000 lb (363 to 454 kg).

Weatherability: Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good after 90 days of weathering.

Leaf Loss: Total leaf and stem loss was 4.5% in alfalfa at a moisture content of 15%. This was considered good.

Ease of Operation: Starting and forming the bale was easy with the Vicon in most crops. Preloading the hydraulic system was important for proper bale density control.

The electric twine wrapping system required little operator experience to tie a good bate. The bale density gauge cued the operator when to tie the bale. The operator was required to stop before starting the wrapping procedure. A bale kicker made backing unnecessary to clear the bale from under the gate. A bate could be wrapped and discharged in about 65 to 75 seconds.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in most crops, but plugging occurred frequently in greenfeed and occasionally in damp hay or straw. The distance between the end of the pickup and the beginning of the forming platform seemed to be the major cause for this problem. Overloading the bale chamber caused the driveline shear pin to break, while overloading the pickup caused the drive belt to slip.

The Vicon was easy to maneuver and transport, but visibility to the rear was restricted.

Ease of Adjustment: Servicing, maintenance and routine adjustments were simple.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 47 hp (38 kW) in hay on firm level fields. A 70 hp (52 kW) tractor was suggested by the manufacturer to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly fields.

Operator Safety: The Vicon was safe to operate if personal precautions were observed. One important precaution was shutting off the PTO when checking or servicing the twine box and tying mechanism. This was very important because the twine box and tying mechanism were located above the pickup.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very well written and useful. Instructions for the windguard and pickup adjustment did not closely correspond with design.

Mechanical Problems: No serious mechanical problems occurred during the 167 hours of field tests.

Summary of New Idea 486 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.13 MB )

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the New Idea 486 was 4.5 ton/h (4.1 t/h) in wheat straw and 8.6 ton/h (7.8 t/h) in alfalfa. Throughput was limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Bale Quality: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in most crops. Bale quality in very short straw was fair due to poor bale durability. Hay bales weighed from 1200 to 1500 lb (550 to 680 kg) and straw bales from 800 to 1000 lb (360 to 450 kg).

Resistance to moisture penetration and spoilage was very good after 100 days of weathering. Total leaf and stem loss was 3.2% in alfalfa at a moisture content of 13%. This was considered very good.

Ease of Operation: Bale forming, bale wrapping, bale discharging, transporting, twine threading, and hitching were all rated very good. Feeding was rated as good. Starting and forming a bale was very easy in most crops. Reduced ground speed in heavy, damp hay was required to prevent occasional plugging of the pickup.

The electric twine wrapping system required little operator experience to tie a good bale. The control box in the tractor cab alerted the operator when to begin the wrapping procedure. The optional trip gate made backing unnecessary to clear the bale from under the gate. A bale could be wrapped and discharged in about 40 to 50 seconds.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in plugging occurred occasionally in damp or tough straw. Overloading the bale chamber caused the shear pin to break, while overloading the pickup drive belt to slip.

The New Idea 486 was easy to maneuver and transport. Visibility to the rear was restricted.

Ease of Adjustment: Ease of adjusting the wrap setting was excellent. Ease of adjusting the drive chain and forming belt tension was very good, and ease of lubricating was good.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 74 hp (55 kW) in hay and straw in level fields. A 90 hp(67 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly land.

Operator Safety: Operator safety on the New Idea 486 was very good if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. It was well written and clearly illustrated.

Mechanical Problems: Several shear pins broke and eventually replaced with a higher grade bolt. The twine cut-off mechanisms malfunctioned from the start of testing and were replaced after 66 hours. Two forming belts turned inside out and the full bale switch malfunctioned and was replaced.

Summary of New Holland 855 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.13 MB )

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the New Holland 855 was 4.1 ton/h (3.7 t/h) in wheat straw and 9.1 ton/h (8.3 t/h) in alfalfa. Throughput was limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Quality of Work: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in all crops except short straw. In this case, bale quality was fair to good due to poor bale durability. Hay bales weighed from 1200 to 1400 lb (540 to 640 kg) stem and straw bales from 850 to 1100 lb (390 to 500 kg).

Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good after 100 days of weathering. Total leaf loss was 1.8% at a 13% moisture content which was considered excellent.

Ease of Operation: Bale wrapping and bale discharging were rated as excellent: bale forming, hitching and feeding were very good; transposing and twine threading were good. Starting and forming a bale was very easy. The operator simply followed the Bale Command's direction after the core was formed to achieve a well formed bale. In short straw, reduced PTO speed was required to start the bale.

The automatic twine wrapping device required the operator to Stop, once the wrapping operation began. A bale ejector and reverse apron chain drive made backing unnecessary to clear the bale from under the gate. A bale could be wrapped and discharged in about 40 seconds.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in all crops. Overloading the pickup caused shearbolt failure of activation of the clutch. The New Holland 855 was easy to maneuver and transport. Visibility to the rear was restricted.

Ease of Adjustment: Ease of adjusting the apron chains, bale size, bale density was rated as very good. Ease of adjusting the pickup and twine wrapping and ease of lubricating were good.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 31 hp (23 kW) in hay and straw in level fields. tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on hilly land.

Operator Safety: Operator safety on the New Holland 855 was very good if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. It was well written and clearly illustrated.

Mechanical History: Two rubber door fasteners were broken after 20 hours and the pickup lift arm had to be straightened after 160 hours. All mechanical problems encountered during the test were considered minor.

Summary of Gehl RB 1710 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.12 MB )

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the Gehl RB 1710 varied from 2.5 ton/h (2.3 t/h) in wheat straw to 10.5 ton/h (9.5 t/h) in alfalfa-timothy-clover. Throughput was usually limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Quality of Work: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in all conditions except short straw. In this case, bale quality was fair to good due to poor bale durability as a result of limiting bale density pressure. Hay bales weighed from 1100 to 1400 lb (500 to 640 kg) and straw bales weighed from 750 to 1000 lb (340 to 450 kg).

Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good after 100 days of weathering. Total leaf loss was 7.9% at a 13% moisture content which was considered fair.

Ease of Operation: Ease of bale forming, transporting, hitching, and feeding was very good; ease of bale discharging and twine threading was good, and ease of twine wrapping was fair. Starting and forming a bale was very easy with the Gehl 1710. In short straw, the bale density pressure had to be limited to about 2200 psi (15.2 MPa) or the bale would stop rolling in the chamber.

The twine cut-off mechanism was very inconsistent. Either it cut the twine off too short to start wrapping the next bale or it would not cut the twine at all. Best success was achieved when the tractor engine was idled down to its lowest speed just prior to moving the twine guide tubes to their home position. The operator was required to stop forward motion of the tractor once the wrapping operation began. The baler had to be backed up to clear the bale from under the gate before starting a new bale. A bale could be wrapped and discharged in about 40 seconds.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in all crops. Overloading the bale chamber caused the shearbolts to break, while overloading the pickup caused activation of the slip clutch.

Ease of Adjustment: Ease of adjusting the roller drive chains and the pickup was very good; and ease of lubricating was good. Daily servicing took one person about 15 minutes.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 73 hp (54 kW) in hay and straw on level fields. A 90 hp (67 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly fields.

Operator Safety: Operator safety on the Gehl 1710 was very good if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. It was well written and clearly illustrated.

Mechanical History: One chain idler wore out, several lower rollers were dented after baling in a field with tree roots, and the twine cut-off mechanism malfunctioned during the evaluation.

Summary of Gehl 1865 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.15 MB )

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the Gehl 1865 varied from 2.3 ton/h (2.1 t/h) in flax straw to 12.0 ton/h (10.9 t/h) in slough grass. Throughput was limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Quality of Work: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in all crops. The bales were well formed and neat in appearance. Hay bales weighed from 1000 to 2100 lb (450 to 950 kg) and straw bales from 600 to 1200 lb (270 to 540 kg).

Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good after 112 days of weathering. Total leaf loss ranged from 1.9 to 4.1% at 17% MC which was considered very good.

Ease of Operation: Ease of pickup feeding was excellent; ease of twine wrapping, bale discharging, transporting and hitching was very good, ease of twine threading was good, and ease of bale forming was fair. Constant side to side weaving was essential to forming a good bale. If the edges of the pickup were not evenly fed with the centre, the outer forming belts often became slack and tangled with the belts adjacent to them.

The auto-electric wrap system required the operator to stop, once the wrapping operation began. Adjustable bale ramps made backing unnecessary to clear the bale from under the gate. A bale could be wrapped and discharged in about 40 to 60 seconds. A stiff piece of wire was needed to thread the dual twine tubes.

Ease of Adjustment: Ease of adjusting the forming belts, wrap settings, and bale size and density was excellent and ease of adjusting the compression rollers, bale starter and pickup was good. Ease of lubricating the test machine was good. Most adjustments were fast and simple, and accomplished with common farm tools.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 25 hp (16 kW) in hay and straw on level fields. A 60 hp (45 kW) tractor was suggested by the manufacturer to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly fields. The specific capacity of the Gehl 1865 was calculated at 0.73 ton/hp-h (0.89 t/kW-h) in alfalfa at an instantaneous workrate of 12.5 ton/h (11.4 t/h).

Operator Safety: Operator safety on the Gehl RB 1865 was very good if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. It was well written and clearly illustrated.

Mechanical Problems: The outer forming belts became slack and twisted throughout the test. On one occasion the twisted belt bent the rear guide. The pickup drive pulley fell off and the overfill clutch cable pulley broke. The centre windguard fingers bent throughout the test due to contact with the twine tube.

Summary of Rampak Silage Bagger (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.18 MB )

Rate of Work: When the bales were within 100 ft (30 m) of the storage site, it took about 30 minutes to fill the bag. Installation of the rolled poly tubing required 25 minutes, while the folded plastic took 10 minutes.

Quality of Work: Quality of work was very good. Performance of the Rampak depended on the shape of the bale. Bales from expanding chamber balers were best suited to the Rampak. Bale weight ranged from 1400 to 1700 lb (635 to 770 kg) at the 40 to 50% recommended moisture content

Ease of Operation: Ease of hitching was good. Installing the poly tubing onto the drum took two men 20 minutes for the poly tubing sleeve on the roll and one man about five minutes to install the folded poly tubing sleeve. It took one man an additional five minutes to tie the bag.

Loading bales onto the carriage of the Rampak was convenient for most front-end loaders. The carriage was convenient for loading directly with grapples or the ramp could be used with loaders having bale forks. Ovated (oval shaped) bales had to be rotated so that the larger diameter was vertical.

Shear bolts protected the Rampak when misaligned or oversized bales caught the sides of the drum. Replacing shear bolts was very difficult and required two men.

The drop extension rail stop had failed near the beginning of the test. The rail had to be held up against the bale to properly engage it.

No adjustment was required through the duration of the test. The ram guide wheels required occasional lubrication.
Power Requirements: A 30 to 50 hp (22 to 37 kW) tractor with a single hydraulic outlet was sufficient.

Operator Safety: The Rampak was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were followed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was good. It was clearly written and contained some useful information on operation. It lacked information on lubrication and shear bolt replacement procedure.

Mechanical History: The drop extension rail stops caused the rail tubing to deform twice.

Summary of Deutz-Allis GP 2.50 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.13 MB )

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the Deutz-Allis 2.50 varied from 1.9 ton/h (1.7 t/h) in barley straw to 8.3 ton/h (7.5 t/h) in alfalfa. Throughput was usually limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by bale chamber capacity.

Quality of Work: Bale quality was very good, with well formed and durable bales in all conditions except short straw. In this case, bale quality was fair to good due to poor bale durability as a result of limiting bale density pressure. Hay bales weighed from 800 to 1100 lb (360 to 500 kg) and straw bales weighed from 500 to 700 lb (230 to 320 kg).

Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good. Total leaf loss was 5.8% at a 17% moisture content which was considered good.

Ease of Operation: Ease of bale forming, transporting, hitching, feeding and twine threading was very good, ease of bale discharging was good, and ease of twine wrapping was fair. Starting and forming a bale was very easy with the Deutz-Allis 2.50. In short straw, the bale density pressure had to be limited or the bale would stop rolling in the chamber.

The twine cut-off mechanism was inconsistent. Frequent twine wrapping misses resulted when operating the baler in windy conditions. The twine wrapping mechanism worked very well when there was no wind. The operator was required to stop forward motion of the tractor once the wrapping operation began. Occasionally, the ramps did not roll the bale far enough to clear the bale from under the tailgate. A bale could be wrapped and discharged in about 30 to 40 seconds.

Feeding was positive and aggressive in all crops. Overloading the bale chamber or the pickup caused the appropriate shearbolt to break.

Ease of Adjustment: Ease of adjusting the roller drive chains and the pickup was very good, and ease of lubricating was excellent. Weekly servicing took one person about 15 minutes.

Power Requirements: Peak power requirements were about 60 hp (45 kW) in hay and straw on level fields. An 80 hp (60 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly fields.

Operator Safety: Operator safety on the Deutz-Allis 2.50 was very good if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was fair. It contained important information but lacked detail in places.

Mechanical History: A pickup cam track retainer clip fell off, most of the pickup teeth required replacement and several shear pins were broken.

Summary of Vermeer Bale Wrapper (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.13 MB )

Rate of Work: For bales within 100 ft (30 m) of the storage site, work rates of 15 to 18 wrapped bales/hour were realized. Two operators were able to improve this to 20 to 24 bales/hour.

Quality of Work: Quality of work was very good. Performance of the Vermeer depended on how well the bales were formed. Barrel shaped or cone shaped bales caused the plastic to wrap loosely on parts of the bale. The plastic wrap was durable when applied as recommended with two wraps around the bale.

Storability of the bales wrapped by the Vermeer was very good. Bales wrapped at moisture contents below 18% and arranged with a 4 to 6 in (100 to 150 mm) gap between the exposed ends of adjacent bales showed no evidence of hay spoilage.

Ease of Operation: Ease of hitching, plastic wrap installation, wrapping, knife operation, removal of plastic and lubrication was very good. Ease of loading and unloading was good. Ease of adjusting the plastic wrap tension and maneuverability was fair. Installing the plastic wrap roll was easily done by one person from the floor of a pickup truck box. Plastic wrap tension was generally controlled by applying pressure with a gloved hand against the plastic roll. A brake that was provided to apply pressure to the roll, proved to be inadequate. Backing into a bale or attempting to align the bales when unloading was difficult due to the trailer wanting to steer itself. Operator experience assisted with this.

No adjustments were required throughout the duration of the test. Daily servicing took one person about 5 minutes.

Power Requirements: A 40 hp (30 kW) tractor equipped with 5 gpm (22.7 L/min) hydraulic capacity and two remote hydraulic outlets was ideally suited to the Vermeer.

Operator Safety: The Vermeer was safe to operate if normal safety precautions were followed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. It contained some useful information on operation and was well written and clearly illustrated.

Mechanical History: No mechanical problems occurred during the test.

Summary of Unverferth RA 220 Bale Wrapper (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.14 MB )

Rate of Work: Peak work rates of 10 to 12 bales/hour were realized. Rate of work was highly dependent upon the proximity of the hay bales to the storage site.

Quality of Work: Quality of work of the wrapping system was very good. The Unverferth was well suited to bale shape variations. The clinging agent of the plastic provided a good bond between the plastic layers. Storability of wrapped bales was very good. A space of 4 to 6 in (100 to 150 mm) between bales placed end to end provided good ventilation.

Ease of Operation: Ease of hitching, plastic wrap installation and removal of plastic was very good. Ease of wrapping, loading and unloading, and maneuverability was good. Plastic wrap rolls were easy to install. Well formed bales loaded onto the Unverferth concentrically ensured easy wrapping. Operator had to disengage carrier winch in advance of wrap completion to prevent damage to the winch. Plastic was easily removed.

Ease of Adjustment: Ease of adjusting plastic overlap was very good. Ease of adjusting the plastic wrap tension was fair. Ease of lubricating the Unverferth was good. Adjustments were fast and simple and accomplished with common farm tools.

Power Requirements: Most 65 hp (50 kW) tractors were of adequate weight to maintain stability while supporting up to a 2000 lb (900 kg) bale on the three-point hitch.

Operator Safety: Operation of the Unverferth required special safety precautions.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was poor. Among other items, the operator's manual failed to include specific safety instructions or warnings, descriptions of major components and repair instructions. The instructions presented in the operator's manual provided limited information.

Mechanical History: The drive gear of the hydraulic motor failed. The carrier winch plate distorted during the evaluation. The drive wheel periodically rubbed against the frame.

Summary of Vicon MP800 Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.12 MB )

Rate of Work: The typical rate of work varied from 8.1 to 21.2 ton/h (7.3 to 19.2 t/h) in alfalfa and from 7.9 to 8.3 ton/h (7.2 to 7.5 t/h) in straw. Peak work rate was 21.2 ton/h (19.2 t/h) in alfalfa. The rate of work was limited by the performance of the pickup and feeding mechanism.

Quality of Work: Bale quality was very good. Bale quality was reduced in very light windrows. Average bale density varied from 13.0 to 16.1 lb/ft³ (208 to 258 kg/m³) in alfalfa. Leaf and stem losses were less than 2%. Knotter performance was very good.

Ease of Operation: The automatic tying of the bales allowed for continuous operation of the baler. The electric remote controls worked well and allowed the operator to adjust bale density from the tractor.

Feeding of the pickup and augers was positive and aggressive in all crops. Ease of hitching was fair and ease of transporting was good.

Ease of Adjustment: A special wrench, which was not supplied, was required to adjust the pickup and auger slip clutches. Adjustment of the knotters was very good. The lubrication guide was incomplete, making adequate lubrication difficult. Bale length was very easy to adjust.

Power Consumption: A tractor with a minimum power take-off rating of 90 hp (68 kW) would have sufficient power to operate the Vicon MP800 on flat, firm fields.

Operator Safety: Four safety concerns were evident during the evaluation. Otherwise the baler was safe to operate and maintain if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was fair. It lacked a lubrication guide and detailed drawings were not clear.

Mechanical History: A few minor mechanical problems occurred during the evaluation.

Summary of Hesston 560 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.16 MB )

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the Hesston 560 varied from 4.3 ton/h (3.9 t/h)in mixed grasses to 13.3 ton/h (12.1 t/h)in alfalfa. Throughput was limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by the bale chamber capacity.

Bale quality was excellent, with well formed and durable bales in all crops. Hay bales weighed from 1300 to 2000 lb (590 to 900 kg) and straw bales weighed from 900 to 1200 lb (408 to 550 kg).

Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good. Minimal spoilage had occurred during the 111 day weathering period. Leaf loss was rated very good. Total leaf loss ranged from 1.0 to 3.2% at 15% MC.

Ease of Operation: Ease of forming a bale was very good. The operator followed the direction lights on the monitor to produce a well formed bale. In hot, dry conditions it was sometimes necessary to reduce the PTO speed. Ease of feeding the bale chamber was excellent. The baler's feeding system was positive and aggressive in all crops. Ease of twine wrapping was very good and the ease of bale discharging was excellent. Twine wrapping and bale discharging were automatically sequenced and were completed in about 60 to 80 seconds.

Ease of transporting was good. The baler was easily maneuvered but required care when backing up due to poor rear visibility. Ease of hitching the baler to a tractor was very good. Hitching components included a drawpin, PTO driveline and an electrical connection to the baler's monitor. Because the baler's hydraulic system was self contained, remote hydraulics were not required. Twine threading was excellent. Twine was easily threaded through the open twine arm without the use of mechanical aids.

Ease of Adjustment: Ease of relieving forming belt tension was excellent and was accomplished by turning a hydraulic valve. Ease of adjusting the pickup was good. The pickup height was controlled by a hand crank and required adjustment at each field. Ease of adjusting the bale size and density was excellent. Their controls were located on the baler and were simple to adjust. Ease of adjusting the twine wrap settings was very good. These adjustments included the number of twine wraps around the bale, the distance between the end wraps of twine and the end of the bale, and the twine tension. Ease of lubricating was good. Complete daily servicing took about 20 minutes.

Power Consumption: Peak power requirements were about 41hp (31 kW) in hay on level fields. It was found that a 65 hp (49 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft land. The specific capacity of the Hesston 560 was 0.44 ton/hp-h (0.54 t/ kW-h) in alfalfa at an instantaneous workrate of 13.0 ton/h (11.8 t/h) with the baler set at its highest density.

Operator Safety: Operator safety of the Hesston 560 was very good if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. It was well written and clearly illustrated.

Mechanical History: A twine guide rod broke at 105 hours, the electronic twine feeding sensor broke at 130 hours and a belt lacing pin broke at 132 hours. Numerous pickup teeth broke throughout the test.

Summary of Case International 8460 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.14 MB )

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the Case International 8460 varied from 4.3 ton/h (3.9 t/h) in mixed grasses to 13.3 ton/h (12.1 t/ h) in alfalfa. Throughput was limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by the bale chamber capacity.

Quality of Work: Bale quality was excellent, with well formed and durable bales in all crops. Hay bales weighed from 1300 to 2000 lb (590 to 900 kg) and straw bales weighed from 900 to 1200 lb (408 to 550 kg).

Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good. Minimal spoilage had occurred during the 111 day weathering period. Leaf loss was rated very good. Total leaf loss ranged from 1.0 to 3.2% at 15% MC.

Ease of Operation: Ease of forming a bale was very good. The operator followed the direction lights on the monitor to produce a well formed bale. In hot, dry conditions it was sometimes necessary to reduce the PTO speed. Ease of feeding the bale chamber was excellent. The baler's feeding system was positive and aggressive in all crops. Ease of twine wrapping was very good and the ease of bale discharging was excellent. Twine wrapping and bale discharging were automatically sequenced and were completed in about 60 to 80 seconds.

Ease of transporting was good. The baler was easily maneuvered but required care when backing up due to poor rear visibility. Ease of hitching the baler to a tractor was very good. Hitching components included a drawpin, PTO driveline and an electrical connection to the baler's monitor. Because the baler's hydraulic system was self contained, remote hydraulics were not required. Twine threading was excellent. Twine was easily threaded through the open twine arm without the use of mechanical aids.

Ease of Adjustment: Ease of relieving forming belt tension was excellent and was accomplished by turning a hydraulic valve. Ease of adjusting the pickup was good. The pickup height was controlled by a hand crank and required adjustment at each field. Ease of adjusting the bale size and density was excellent. Their controls were located on the baler and were simple to adjust. Ease of adjusting the twine wrap settings was very good. These adjustments included the number of twine wraps around the bale, the distance between the end wraps of twine and the end of the bale, and the twine tension. Ease of lubricating was good. Complete daily servicing took about 20 minutes.

Power Consumption: Peak power requirements were about 41 hp (31 kW) in hay on level fields. It was found that a 65 hp (49 kW) tractor was needed to fully utilize baler capacity on soft land. The specific capacity of the Case International 8460 was 0.44 ton/hp-h (0.54 t/kW-h) in alfalfa at an instantaneous workrate of 13.0 ton/h (11.8 t/h) with the baler set at its highest density.

Operator Safety: Operator safety of the Case International 8460 was very good if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operator's manual was very good. It was well written and clearly illustrated.

Mechanical History: A twine guide rod broke at 105 hours, the electronic twine feeding sensor broke at 130 hours and a belt lacing pin broke at 132 hours. Numerous pickup teeth broke throughout the test.

Summary of John Deere 535 Round Baler (Evaluation Report - PDF File - 0.15 MB )

Rate of Work: Typical throughput of the John Deere 535 varied from 5.4 ton/h (4.9 t/h) in mixed grasses wrapped with twine to 18.0 ton/h (16.3 t/h) in alfalfa wrapped with net wrap. Throughput was limited by pickup and feeding performance rather than by the bale chamber capacity.

Quality of Work: Bale quality was excellent, with well formed and durable bales in all crops. Hay bales weighed from 1000 to 1500 lb (450 to 680 kg) and straw bales weighed from 800 to 1000 lb (360 to 450 kg). Net wrapped bales were observed to be more durable than twine wrapped bales.

Resistance to bale moisture penetration and spoilage was very good. Minimal spoilage had occurred during the 100 day weathering period. Leaf loss was rated very good. Total leaf loss at 12% MC was 2.5% for twine wrapped bales and 1.8% for net wrapped bales. Net wrap accounted for a 27% reduction in leaf loss.

Ease of Operation and Adjustment: Ease of forming a bale was very good. The bale shape indicators helped the operator produce a well formed bale. In hot dry conditions it was sometimes necessary to reduce the PTO speed. Ease of feeding the bale chamber was excellent. The baler's feeding system was positive and aggressive in all crops. Ease of twine and net wrapping was good and ease of bale discharging was very good. The wrapping cycle was automatically activated when the bale had reached the preset size. Bale wrapping and bale discharging were automatically sequenced and were completed in about 40 to 45 seconds and 15 to 20 seconds for twine and net wrap respectively.

Ease of transporting was good. The baler was easily maneuvered but required care when backing up due to poor rear visibility. Ease of hitching the baler to a tractor was very good. Hitching components included a drawpin, PTO driveline, one hydraulic remote circuit and an electrical connection to the baler's monitor. Twine threading was good and net wrap threading was very good. Twine was easily threaded through the front twine arm but threading the inner twine arm was less convenient.

Ease of adjustment was good. Adjustments were simple but reference positions and decals were not included on the baler. This often made adjustments a trial and error process, Ease of lubricating was good. Complete daily servicing took about 20 minutes.

Power Consumption: Peak power requirements were about 50 hp (38 kW) in hay on level fields at high workrates. A 75 hp (56 kW) tractor was suggested by the manufacturer to fully utilize baler capacity on soft and hilly fields. The specific capacity of the John Deere 535 was 0.53 ton/hp-h (0.65 t/kW-h) in alfalfa at an instantaneous workrate of 17.8 ton/h (16.1 t/h) with twine wrapped high density bales. The specific capacity was 0.62 ton/hp-h (0.76 t/kWh) in alfalfa at an instantaneous workrate of 20.4 ton/h (18.5 t/h) with net wrapped high density bales.

Operator Safety: Operator safety of the John Deere 535 was very good if normal safety precautions were observed.

Operator's Manual: The operators manual was very good. It was well written and clearly illustrated.

Mechanical History: A twine guide rod bent and the mechanism that holds the twine arms apart bent during the test.

 
 
 
 
For more information about the content of this document, contact Debbie Campbell.
This document is maintained by Nicole Huggins-Rawlins.
This information published to the web on February 12, 2002.
Last Reviewed/Revised on February 26, 2015.